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20 Jahre Google: Im Gespräch mit Performance Marketing Agentur blueSummit über die Bedeutung der Suche

Programmierung vom 22.11.2018 um 01:00 Uhr | Quelle thinkwithgoogle.com
20 Jahre Google: Im Gespräch mit Performance Marketing Agentur blueSummit über die Bedeutung der Suche
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Announcing Azure DevOps Server 2019 RC1

Programmierung vom 21.11.2018 um 18:49 Uhr | Quelle blogs.msdn.microsoft.com

Yesterday, we announced Azure DevOps Server 2019 RC1. This is the evolution of TFS and the first release with our new brand and new navigation. We’ve added a ton of new features which you can read about in our release notes.

This is a go-live release, meaning you can install it on production servers. We expect to have another RC release before our final release.

Here are some key links:
Azure DevOps Server 2019 RC1 ISO
Azure DevOps Server 2019 RC1 Web Install
Release Notes

We’d love for you to install this release candidate and provide any feedback at Developer Community.


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Why Are Robots Becoming Pythonistas?

Programmierung vom 21.11.2018 um 18:36 Uhr | Quelle youtube.com

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AI, Machine Learning and Data Science Roundup: November 2018

Programmierung vom 21.11.2018 um 18:05 Uhr | Quelle blog.revolutionanalytics.com

A monthly roundup of news about Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Data Science. This is an eclectic collection of interesting blog posts, software announcements and data applications from Microsoft and elsewhere that I've noted over the past month or so.

Open Source AI, ML & Data Science News

torchdiffeq: A GPU-enabled PyTorch library for ordinary differential equation (ODE) solving.

Tensorflow 1.12 released.

Visual Studio Code adds support for Jupyter Notebooks, with the ability to import Notebooks into Code, and interact with cells via the iPython kernel.

Industry News

Amazon Comprehend, the AWS natural language processing service, can now be customized with user-defined entities and categories.

Google Cloud Platform introduces AI Hub, a place to publicly host and privately (within-enterprise) share and deploy pipelines, Jupyter notebooks, TensorFlow modules, and more.

A Chrome extension to open a Github-hosted Jupyter Notebook in Google Colab.

Facebook open-sources Horizon, a reinforcement learning platform that exports models in ONNX for deployment in large-scale production environments.

Google open-sources BERT (Bidirectional Encoder Representations), a system for pre-training natural language models with large corpuses of unannotated text.

Microsoft News

Microsoft has acquired XOXOCO, a startup focused on chatbots.

Microsoft Cognitive Services in Containers. Face detection and text analytics APIs in self-hosted containers that do not require private data to be sent to the cloud for analysis.

Named Entity Recognition comes to the Cognitive Services Text Analytics API, to identify persons, locations, organizations and other entities in unstructured text.

Azure Machine Learning Studio upgrades R support with the addition of the R 3.4 language engine.

New AI capabilities in preview for Power BI: AI model builder, Cognitive Services integration, and Azure Machine Learning interface. 

The Microsoft Data Science Virtual Machine now includes Catboost, the open-source gradient boosting on decision trees library.

AzureR, a new suite of packages for managing Azure services from R.

Learning resources

A guide to translate between different terms used for similar concepts in Statistics and Machine Learning, from CMU.

Best Practices for Using Machine Learning in Businesses: Szilard Pafka cuts through the hype in this Twitter-summary of his keynote presentation.

A comparison of automatic machine learning services: Google AutoML, Microsoft Automated ML, AutoKeras and auto-sklearn.

Using Docker to deploy an R API with the plumber package.

Applications

Google uses acoustic analysis to identify humpback whales by their call.

Uber's approach to evaluating experiments: look at the entire distribution of outcomes, because focusing on just the mean or median can be misleading.

T-mobile uses R in production to route customer service queries with natural language AI.

Find previous editions of the monthly AI roundup here.


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How to develop secure applications using Azure Cosmos DB

Programmierung vom 21.11.2018 um 14:00 Uhr | Quelle azure.microsoft.com

Before we begin to discuss how to develop secure applications using Azure Cosmos DB, we should also highlight some of the different layers of security that Azure Cosmos DB offers. The following image illustrates these various layers of security:

flow chart for the various layers of security provided by Cosmos DB

Azure Cosmos DB is a ring zero Azure service, this means it will be available in any new Azure data center as soon as it goes online and must keep all its compliance certificates current. Azure Cosmos DB has a plethora of certifications that you can read more about in the blog post “Azure #CosmosDB: Secure, private, compliant”.

The first layer of Azure provides physical safety of data centers and continuous protections from DDoS attacks. Azure has dedicated teams to continuously monitor the security issues. All Azure services run a common security agent to collect anomalous activity. Production resources are patched regularly and all the secrets, certificates, or passwords have a defined lifetime. These certificates or secrets should be rotated after they expire. All the production ports in Azure Cosmos DB are scanned and penetration tested regularly. The source code is scanned for security issues and they require two approvers before integrating into the product. For additional information, read more about Azure Data Centers.

Map of availability regions, announced regions, and availability zones

Access to Azure is restricted. Operations staff or developers working for Azure Cosmos DB cannot access any production from their machines. All production is accessed via dedicated secure access workstations (SAWs). These workstations are watertight, there is no outside access from these machines unless it is through Azure. Engineers get just in time (JIT) approval for all production access. All access is monitored and every activity of an engineer is monitored by an escort.  All production deployments require multiple approvals including test sign off and approvers.

Azure has a very strict access policy by Microsoft personnel. It is almost impossible for any Microsoft employee to access the production system if he or she is not authorized. I am mentioning these details because customers often ask if their data is secure in Azure and whether Azure Cosmos DB engineering teams can access their data.

Security offered by IP firewall

Using an IP firewall is the first layer of protection to secure your database. Azure Cosmos DB supports policy driven IP-based access controls for inbound firewall support. This model is like the firewall rules of a traditional database system and provides an additional level of security to the Azure Cosmos DB account. With this model, you can now configure an Azure Cosmos DB account to be accessible only from an approved set of machines and/or cloud services. Access to Azure Cosmos DB resources from these approved sets of machines and services still require the caller to present a valid authorization token.

The IP access control policy can be set in the Azure portal, or programmatically through Azure CLI, Azure PowerShell, or the REST API by updating the “ipRangeFilter” property. For additional information, read more on how to setup a IP firewall for Cosmos DB.

Security offered by virtual network

Virtual network is the next layer that secures Azure Cosmos DB accounts. You can configure your Azure Cosmos DB account to allow access only from a specific subnet of Azure Virtual Networks. By enabling a service endpoint for Azure Cosmos DB from a virtual network and its subnet, traffic is ensured an optimal and secure route to Azure Cosmos DB.

Once an Azure Cosmos DB account is configured with a virtual network service endpoint, it can be accessed only from the specified subnet, and the public or Internet access is removed. To learn in detail about service endpoints, refer to the Azure “Virtual Network Service Endpoints” overview article. You can also learn more about virtual network and Azure Cosmos DB in our “Access Azure Cosmos DB resources from virtual networks “documentation.

You can filter network traffic to and from Azure resources in an Azure Virtual Network with a network security group. A network security group contains security rules that allow or deny inbound network traffic and outbound network traffic from several types of Azure resources. For additional information, learn more about network security groups.

Access control with keys

The security layers discussed so far come as part of Azure Cosmos DB and don’t require much other than configuring the firewall and virtual network. Now, let’s discuss what you can do as an application developer. All access to Azure Cosmos DB is controlled by two keys, a master key and read-only key. Master key, as its name implies is a master key and can do all operations on Azure Cosmos DB. A read-only key enables you to read the data, but no other actions are possible with this key.

Developers may worry about keys, wondering if someone could steal them and access their data. The rest of this post will discuss the architecture you should adopt to build a secure application on Azure Cosmos DB.

Architecture for building a secure application

First, no application should have access keys in the config file or in code. Keys should always be kept in Key Vault. Your application or users can have managed identities registered with Key Vault and they can get the keys at the run time. Read more on how to integrate key-vault with Azure Cosmos DB.

Second, application should not try to access the database directly. They should have a middle tier web service to access data. This approach provides the following benefits:

  • Frontend application can call REST service to get the data. Frontend does not need to understand different API’s of Azure Cosmos DB. Azure Cosmos DB is a multi-model database, data can be kept in different formats, but the frontend applications can be abstracted away from all the details of data access.
  • Generally you may have many applications, in different formats (PC, phone, and web) which will be accessing the same data. Not all application must repeat the data retrieval logic.
  • You can provide throttling if needed to any rogue application at the web service layer before they can harm the database.
  • You can audit at the finer granularity all the access to database.
  • And then of course, there are different benefits of three tier architecture e.g. abstraction from data layer, opportunity for caching, different teams can work on different layer parallelly, scaling different layers separately, ease of maintenance etc.

Moreover, the biggest benefit is that you only have one service which needs to access keys. As you rotate keys only one service will need to refresh them, rather than hundreds or thousands of clients.

Flow chart of Application authentication by Azure Active Directory and REST web service

As shown above, you can have an application, which is authenticated by AAD and calls the REST web service. The application shown above can be tens of thousands of instance of a web site. REST API will get the caller identity in the call. Here is an opportunity for this web service to apply some business rules for the call. This web service can consult its custom rules to see which user has permission for which Azure Cosmos DB collection. Once the business rule layer validates the call, Data Service can get the keys from Key-Vault to access the data from Azure Cosmos DB.

If you are following Azure Cosmos DB closely, you may wonder about resource tokens. You should prefer the above architecture rather than implementing a service which can dispense the resource tokens and then a client can use those resource tokens to access Azure Cosmos DB directly.

I will assert having a data service is a better design than letting multiple client apps directly access the database. Resource token is a right solution for any small application, but it has some of its own limitations. Resource token does not work for all the API’s. It works only for SQL API. You still have to create a web service, which will dispense the token as per your business rules, so why don’t that service go one-step ahead and dispense the data itself.

Yes, you are adding a hop for the application, and it may be adding few milliseconds, but this is a better alternative to Resource token.
Azure Cosmos DB keeps all your data encrypted at rest and on wire.  With virtual network, IP Filtering, Key-Vault you can built a very secure application with Azure Cosmos DB.

Compliance resources

Risk assessment resources


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Windows Template Studio 2.5 veröffentlicht

Programmierung vom 21.11.2018 um 14:00 Uhr | Quelle microsoft.com
Windows Template Studio 2.5 bringt zahlreiche neue Funktionen und Verbesserungen mit. Die neue Version steht in Visual Studio automatisch bereit, alternativ können Sie die Erweiterung hier herunterladen. Die wichtigsten Neuerungen sind: Schnelleres Starten des Programms durch Template Splitting, Verbesserungen bei der Suspend- und Resume-Funktion und Unterstützung für Visual Studio 2019...
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Windows Template Studio 2.5 veröffentlicht

Programmierung vom 21.11.2018 um 14:00 Uhr | Quelle microsoft.com
Windows Template Studio 2.5 bringt zahlreiche neue Funktionen und Verbesserungen mit. Die neue Version steht in Visual Studio automatisch bereit, alternativ können Sie die Erweiterung hier herunterladen. Die wichtigsten Neuerungen sind: Schnelleres Starten des Programms durch Template Splitting, Verbesserungen bei der Suspend- und Resume-Funktion und Unterstützung für Visual Studio 2019...
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Extension Host is coming to Azure Stack with the next update 1811

Programmierung vom 21.11.2018 um 13:00 Uhr | Quelle azure.microsoft.com

In August 2018, we informed Azure Stack users of a new capability coming to Microsoft Azure Stack though the blog post “Enhance security and simplify network integration with Extension Host on Azure Stack”. This capability further enhances security and simplifies network integration for Azure Stack. We are proud to share that Extension Host will be enabled by the next Azure Stack update, 1811. Please note, this update does require that two additional certificates be imported in advance.

Skipping the required preparation will result in a failure during pre-update validation checks, and will result in a halt to the updating process. There is still time to acquire these two certificates which are necessary for the integration of Azure Stack update 1811.

A validation check is already part of the newly released 1809 hotfix and it shows a warning alert in the operator portal if the required certificates have not yet been imported. This is a reminder with a call to action to follow the preparation guidance in order to be prepared for the upcoming Azure Stack update 1811.

New deployments of Azure Stack have been requiring these two additional certificates since September 2018. Please check with your Azure Stack hardware partner for more specifics.

Thanks for your continued feedback and support for Azure Stack. Please share any thoughts or questions you may have in the comments section below.

Additional Information


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What you need to know when writing hybrid applications

Programmierung vom 21.11.2018 um 10:00 Uhr | Quelle azure.microsoft.com

As of today, Azure is present in 54 regions, several sovereign clouds, as well as in our customers’ data centers through Azure Stack. Consistency is a fundamental pillar of Azure, no matter which region you are deploying your application to, the way you write your scripts and templates is the same.

Consistency is great because it allows you to reuse knowledge and artifacts. This post will provide you with key things you should be aware of when writing your applications to target the different Azure clouds.

  • Resource type availability and versions will vary across different regions and clouds.
  • Available images, virtual machine (VM) sizes, and extensions can vary between the clouds.
  • Azure resource manager (ARM) and the storage endpoints can also vary.

In short, it’s important that you design your code and templates to accept parameters for the above items. Doing so will ensure that you can easily deploy your resources across different clouds. In addition to parametrization, you should also consider leveraging nested templates which could allow you to break down your solution into smaller chunks that can be deployed across different clouds. For more information, read the article, "Develop Azure Resource Manager templates for cloud consistency."

There is also great guidance from our AzureCAT team, which focuses on helping our customers to deploy Azure Stack. Please check out the blog post, "Design considerations for hybrid applications," for more insight and guidance. We had a great line up of sessions at Microsoft Ignite 2018 as well, all of which have valuable resources you can reuse. Here are some sessions that we recommend:

Finally, from the many features and capabilities described in the above links, I’d like to showcase API Profiles as it’s the core of our capability to allow you to write code that effectively takes advantage of the hybrid capabilities and consistency of Azure. API profiles represent a set of Azure resource providers and their API versions that target multiple Azure Cloud Services. The following are the different types of API Profiles:

  • latest

This contains the most recent API versions released in global Azure.

  • yyyy-mm-dd-hybrid

Released at a biannual cadence, this release focuses on consistency and stability across multiple clouds. This profile targets optimal Azure Stack compatibility.

  • yyyy-mm-dd-profile

This feature sits between optimal stability and the latest features.

I hope you find the information in this post useful! Stay tuned for new topics around developing hybrid applications and feel free to follow me and my team on Twitter.

To learn more about hybrid application development, read the previous post, "Developing hybrid applications with Azure Stack."


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Visualize your Cosmos DB Gremlin API graph data with Linkurious enterprise

Programmierung vom 21.11.2018 um 09:00 Uhr | Quelle azure.microsoft.com

Data visualization is one of the most critical components for any kind of solution, and graph databases are no different. For Azure Cosmos DB, a highly-scalable and enterprise-ready visualization solution has been a common ask from customers. The need to visualize connected data is particularly present for both technical and non-technical users who face growing volumes of increasingly complex data. Extracting actionable insights from large and complex datasets is often difficult and time-consuming.

Interactive visualization tools allow for a faster understanding of complex data, and help users achieve a better understanding of problems. As result, users have a higher chance of discovering insights.

“Thanks to Azure Cosmos DB’s integrated Gremlin API, teams of analysts can now use Linkurious’ turnkey graph intelligence platform in combination with Azure Cosmos DB to detect and investigate threats hidden in complex connected data.” 

David Rapin, CTO and co-founder of Linkurious.

Today, we're announcing that the popular graph visualization platform Linkurious enterprise is now available for Azure Cosmos DB Gremlin API databases. On this platform you can create reports and visualizations from graph data while still leveraging full create, read, update, and delete functionality. In addition to that, the product highlights enterprise-ready features including secured access with Azure Active Directory integration.

Azure Cosmos DB and Linkurious logos

You can start using it today with your Azure Cosmos DB database and let users, technical or not, visualize and interact with data in real-time. The platform only requires Gremlin server credentials to connect, and you can use Azure Search to enable full-text search.

To get started, check out the try Linkurious page and their blog post announcement, “Linkurious announces support for Cosmos DB”. You can also follow them on Twitter. If you haven't done so already, you can create a free account at the try Azure Cosmos DB page and select the Graph database option.

Please continue to provide feedback on what you want to see next in our service. Try out Gremlin API today with our Azure Cosmos DB for free experience. If you need any help or have questions and feedback, please reach out to us on the developer forums on Stack Overflow. You can also follow us on Twitter @AzureCosmosDB and #CosmosDB for the latest news and announcements.


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Visualize your Cosmos DB Gremlin API graph data with Linkurious enterprise

Programmierung vom 21.11.2018 um 09:00 Uhr | Quelle azure.microsoft.com

Data visualization is one of the most critical components for any kind of solution, and graph databases are no different. For Azure Cosmos DB, a highly-scalable and enterprise-ready visualization solution has been a common ask from customers. The need to visualize connected data is particularly present for both technical and non-technical users who face growing volumes of increasingly complex data. Extracting actionable insights from large and complex datasets is often difficult and time-consuming.

Interactive visualization tools allow for a faster understanding of complex data, and help users achieve a better understanding of problems. As result, users have a higher chance of discovering insights.

“Thanks to Azure Cosmos DB’s integrated Gremlin API, teams of analysts can now use Linkurious’ turnkey graph intelligence platform in combination with Azure Cosmos DB to detect and investigate threats hidden in complex connected data.” 

David Rapin, CTO and co-founder of Linkurious.

Today, we're announcing that the popular graph visualization platform Linkurious enterprise is now available for Azure Cosmos DB Gremlin API databases. On this platform you can create reports and visualizations from graph data while still leveraging full create, read, update, and delete functionality. In addition to that, the product highlights enterprise-ready features including secured access with Azure Active Directory integration.

Azure Cosmos DB and Linkurious logos

You can start using it today with your Azure Cosmos DB database and let users, technical or not, visualize and interact with data in real-time. The platform only requires Gremlin server credentials to connect, and you can use Azure Search to enable full-text search.

To get started, check out the try Linkurious page and their blog post announcement, “Linkurious announces support for Cosmos DB”. You can also follow them on Twitter. If you haven't done so already, you can create a free account at the try Azure Cosmos DB page and select the Graph database option.

Please continue to provide feedback on what you want to see next in our service. Try out Gremlin API today with our Azure Cosmos DB for free experience. If you need any help or have questions and feedback, please reach out to us on the developer forums on Stack Overflow. You can also follow us on Twitter @AzureCosmosDB and #CosmosDB for the latest news and announcements.


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How to build a Wall Mounted Family Calendar and Dashboard with a Raspberry Pi and cheap monitor

Programmierung vom 21.11.2018 um 04:50 Uhr | Quelle feeds.hanselman.com

Glanceable DashboardI love dashboards. I love Raspberry Pis (tiny $35 computers the size of a set of playing cards). And I'm cheap frugal. I found a 24" old LCD at Goodwill (a local thrift shop) and bought it but it's been sitting unused in my garage.

Then I stumbled on DakBoard. The idea is simple - A wifi connected wall display for your photos, calendar, news, weather and to-do.

The implementation is simple genius. It's a browser that starts up full screen (kiosk mode) and just sits there and updates occasionally. DakBoard provides the private webpage and tools to make that happen. You can certainly build this yourself with any number of open source tools. I chose DakBoard because it was simple, beautiful, and I was able to get the whole thing done in less than an hour. I'm sure I'll spend many hours tweaking it through. There's also the very popular MagicMIrror platform, so lots of choice and power in this space!

What are some considerations?

  • You may want to turn it off on a scheduled to save power and the screen
    • cronjob - turn it off on a schedule
    • sensor - turn it on when something (your alarm, nest, thermostat motion detector attached to GPIO, etc) detects your presence)
  • It has to act like an appliance. If you are messing with it to keep it alive, it's not an appliance, it's another computer to manage.
  • It has to just work. If my Spouse doesn't like the idea or find its not reliable, the SAF (Spouse Acceptance Factor) will be low and they'll want to get rid of it. All it takes is one "why isn't this working" and I'm dead in the water.
  • Finally - What do you want to show?

Someone asked me - "What would I want to put on my dashboard other than a calendar? I don't see why this is useful."

What would you put on a Glance-eable Display?

Family Calendar(s), movie times, temperature, news, my blood sugar, disk free on my NAS, TV schedule, family photos, commute traffic, album releases, homework due soon, family events, trips, flight status, music playing now, literally anything you want as a glance-able display. 

Glanceable Dashboard

Philosophy

You'll want to ask yourself, is this just an iPad on the wall? I'd propose not. In fact, I'd say this is a Wall Mounted Glanceable Display - a personal dashboard - not an interactive thing. I want the family and kids to just stop by, note important information and move on.

It's also worth pointing out the a horizontal monitor on the wall looks like, well, a monitor on the wall. But somehow when it's Portrait it's dramatic. It's not something we are (yet) used to seeing. I may try this out in a few ways, or even make a few of these displays!

How to Build a Raspberry Pi-based Family Calendar

It's pretty easy! I used the DakBoard Blog but I had most of the stuff already.

  • Get a $35 Raspberry Pi 3. The 3 is fast and includes Wifi so you don't need an extra adapter.
  • I like a 2.5A powersupply but some folks say you can run the Raspberry Pi off the monitor's USB power - IF that power can put out at least 1A. 500mA will likely cause instability. It depends on if you want to try to get the whole thing down to one power cable.
  • Cheap SD Card - 8 gigs is fine, but get whatever works for you. This doesn't need to be awesome.
  • A 1 foot HDMI cable. You're gonna mount the Raspberry Pi to the back of the monitor and hide it so you want the cable to be as small as possible.
  • And finally - a 24" ish (smaller is fine) LCD (IPS is nice) monitor with smallish bezels and HDMI inputs that go out to the side (NOT directly out the back) as you want this flush on the wall.
    • Think about how you'll mount it. You can take the back off the monitor and use hanging wire OR use a flush VESA mount.

Install Raspbian on the Raspberry Pi. I use Noobs to bootstrap my install as it's super fast and easy. Go through the standard setup. Make sure you've set up:

  • Wifi login
  • Timezone
  • Boot to Desktop automatically
  • install chromium via "sudo apt-get install -y rpi-chromium-mods"

Then you make sure that Chromium starts up full screen, the mouse is hidden, and we're looking at the dashboard! It's super important you don't have to touch it. It's an appliance, right?

sudo nano ~/.config/lxsession/LXDE-pi/autostart
@xset s off
@xset -dpms
@xset s noblank
@chromium-browser --noerrdialogs --incognito --kiosk http://dakboard.com/app/?p=YOUR_PRIVATE_URL

Then you can set up a cronjob if you want to turn the Pi's screen on and off on a schedule. Using rpi-hdmi.sh you can make a crontab -e that looks like this:

# Turn HDMI Off (22:00/10:00pm)
0 22 * * * /home/pi/rpi-hdmi.sh off
# Turn HDMI On (7:00/7:00am)
0 7 * * * /home/pi/rpi-hdmi.sh on 

My family uses Google Calendar (GSuite) to manage hanselman.com, but I use Outlook at work. I also have a lot of business/work crap in my calendar that the family doesn't need to see. So I have two problems here, filtering, and appointment movement between Work and Home.

My wife and kids use Google Calendar and it's their authoritative source. My work calendar is MY authoritative source, so I want to sync Outlook->Google but ONLY including Personal/Podcasts/Travel categories. I categorize in Outlook at work, and then those appointments that are appropriate for the family calendar get moved over. Then the Family Calendar dashboard includes color coordinated items for Mom, Dad, Kid1, Kid2. The kids include homework that's due as appointments.

I use the Outlook Google Calendar Sync open source project to do this calendar movement for me. It does require Outlook and is a client solution so if you have a better idea let me know.

GOTCHA: I have been using Google Calendar for YEARS. I have also been using sync tools like this for years. As such, I was noticing that sometimes DakBoard would timeout asking for my Google Calendar's ICS file. It would take minutes. So I requested it myself and it was 26 megs. It's clear that Google calendar doesn't care deeply about iCal and that's disappointing. This could easily be solved if they'd support some kind of OData like URL-based query for fromdate=, todate=. In this case, the DakBoard was getting 26 megs over and over to just show a few weeks of appointments. I literally had appointments from 2005 in the calendar. I decided that since I'd declared Outlook my authoritative source for my calendar that I'd take an archive (one time snapshot) of my iCal and then delete all my calendar items from Google Calendar and re-sync, one way, from the authoritative source, going back 1 year. I'm likely a rare case but it's worth noting in case you bump into this.

All in all, this can easily be done in a short few hours if you have a Pi and a monitor. The time will be spent making it "sanitary." Making the cables perfect, hanging it on the wall, hiding the cables, then tweaking the screen to be perfect.

Editing screens on DakBoard

DakBoard has a free option that works great, or a Premium subscription that gives you even more control. Again, it depends on your web/art ability, and your patience. This is a fun new world that I'm excited to get involved with and my family is already stoked about this new display as we enter the holiday season.


Sponsor: Preview the latest JetBrains Rider with its Assembly Explorer, Git Submodules, SQL language injections, integrated performance profiler and more advanced Unity support.



© 2018 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

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How to build a Wall Mounted Family Calendar and Dashboard with a Raspberry Pi and cheap monitor

Programmierung vom 21.11.2018 um 04:50 Uhr | Quelle feeds.hanselman.com

Glanceable DashboardI love dashboards. I love Raspberry Pis (tiny $35 computers the size of a set of playing cards). And I'm cheap frugal. I found a 24" old LCD at Goodwill (a local thrift shop) and bought it but it's been sitting unused in my garage.

Then I stumbled on DakBoard. The idea is simple - A wifi connected wall display for your photos, calendar, news, weather and to-do.

The implementation is simple genius. It's a browser that starts up full screen (kiosk mode) and just sits there and updates occasionally. DakBoard provides the private webpage and tools to make that happen. You can certainly build this yourself with any number of open source tools. I chose DakBoard because it was simple, beautiful, and I was able to get the whole thing done in less than an hour. I'm sure I'll spend many hours tweaking it through. There's also the very popular MagicMIrror platform, so lots of choice and power in this space!

What are some considerations?

  • You may want to turn it off on a scheduled to save power and the screen
    • cronjob - turn it off on a schedule
    • sensor - turn it on when something (your alarm, nest, thermostat motion detector attached to GPIO, etc) detects your presence)
  • It has to act like an appliance. If you are messing with it to keep it alive, it's not an appliance, it's another computer to manage.
  • It has to just work. If my Spouse doesn't like the idea or find its not reliable, the SAF (Spouse Acceptance Factor) will be low and they'll want to get rid of it. All it takes is one "why isn't this working" and I'm dead in the water.
  • Finally - What do you want to show?

Someone asked me - "What would I want to put on my dashboard other than a calendar? I don't see why this is useful."

What would you put on a Glance-eable Display?

Family Calendar(s), movie times, temperature, news, my blood sugar, disk free on my NAS, TV schedule, family photos, commute traffic, album releases, homework due soon, family events, trips, flight status, music playing now, literally anything you want as a glance-able display. 

Glanceable Dashboard

Philosophy

You'll want to ask yourself, is this just an iPad on the wall? I'd propose not. In fact, I'd say this is a Wall Mounted Glanceable Display - a personal dashboard - not an interactive thing. I want the family and kids to just stop by, note important information and move on.

It's also worth pointing out the a horizontal monitor on the wall looks like, well, a monitor on the wall. But somehow when it's Portrait it's dramatic. It's not something we are (yet) used to seeing. I may try this out in a few ways, or even make a few of these displays!

How to Build a Raspberry Pi-based Family Calendar

It's pretty easy! I used the DakBoard Blog but I had most of the stuff already.

  • Get a $35 Raspberry Pi 3. The 3 is fast and includes Wifi so you don't need an extra adapter.
  • I like a 2.5A powersupply but some folks say you can run the Raspberry Pi off the monitor's USB power - IF that power can put out at least 1A. 500mA will likely cause instability. It depends on if you want to try to get the whole thing down to one power cable.
  • Cheap SD Card - 8 gigs is fine, but get whatever works for you. This doesn't need to be awesome.
  • A 1 foot HDMI cable. You're gonna mount the Raspberry Pi to the back of the monitor and hide it so you want the cable to be as small as possible.
  • And finally - a 24" ish (smaller is fine) LCD (IPS is nice) monitor with smallish bezels and HDMI inputs that go out to the side (NOT directly out the back) as you want this flush on the wall.
    • Think about how you'll mount it. You can take the back off the monitor and use hanging wire OR use a flush VESA mount.

Install Raspbian on the Raspberry Pi. I use Noobs to bootstrap my install as it's super fast and easy. Go through the standard setup. Make sure you've set up:

  • Wifi login
  • Timezone
  • Boot to Desktop automatically
  • install chromium via "sudo apt-get install -y rpi-chromium-mods"

Then you make sure that Chromium starts up full screen, the mouse is hidden, and we're looking at the dashboard! It's super important you don't have to touch it. It's an appliance, right?

sudo nano ~/.config/lxsession/LXDE-pi/autostart
@xset s off
@xset -dpms
@xset s noblank
@chromium-browser --noerrdialogs --incognito --kiosk http://dakboard.com/app/?p=YOUR_PRIVATE_URL

Then you can set up a cronjob if you want to turn the Pi's screen on and off on a schedule. Using rpi-hdmi.sh you can make a crontab -e that looks like this:

# Turn HDMI Off (22:00/10:00pm)
0 22 * * * /home/pi/rpi-hdmi.sh off
# Turn HDMI On (7:00/7:00am)
0 7 * * * /home/pi/rpi-hdmi.sh on 

My family uses Google Calendar (GSuite) to manage hanselman.com, but I use Outlook at work. I also have a lot of business/work crap in my calendar that the family doesn't need to see. So I have two problems here, filtering, and appointment movement between Work and Home.

My wife and kids use Google Calendar and it's their authoritative source. My work calendar is MY authoritative source, so I want to sync Outlook->Google but ONLY including Personal/Podcasts/Travel categories. I categorize in Outlook at work, and then those appointments that are appropriate for the family calendar get moved over. Then the Family Calendar dashboard includes color coordinated items for Mom, Dad, Kid1, Kid2. The kids include homework that's due as appointments.

I use the Outlook Google Calendar Sync open source project to do this calendar movement for me. It does require Outlook and is a client solution so if you have a better idea let me know.

GOTCHA: I have been using Google Calendar for YEARS. I have also been using sync tools like this for years. As such, I was noticing that sometimes DakBoard would timeout asking for my Google Calendar's ICS file. It would take minutes. So I requested it myself and it was 26 megs. It's clear that Google calendar doesn't care deeply about iCal and that's disappointing. This could easily be solved if they'd support some kind of OData like URL-based query for fromdate=, todate=. In this case, the DakBoard was getting 26 megs over and over to just show a few weeks of appointments. I literally had appointments from 2005 in the calendar. I decided that since I'd declared Outlook my authoritative source for my calendar that I'd take an archive (one time snapshot) of my iCal and then delete all my calendar items from Google Calendar and re-sync, one way, from the authoritative source, going back 1 year. I'm likely a rare case but it's worth noting in case you bump into this.

All in all, this can easily be done in a short few hours if you have a Pi and a monitor. The time will be spent making it "sanitary." Making the cables perfect, hanging it on the wall, hiding the cables, then tweaking the screen to be perfect.

Editing screens on DakBoard

DakBoard has a free option that works great, or a Premium subscription that gives you even more control. Again, it depends on your web/art ability, and your patience. This is a fun new world that I'm excited to get involved with and my family is already stoked about this new display as we enter the holiday season.


Sponsor: Preview the latest JetBrains Rider with its Assembly Explorer, Git Submodules, SQL language injections, integrated performance profiler and more advanced Unity support.



© 2018 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

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Q&A: Fine-grained friendship

Programmierung vom 20.11.2018 um 23:41 Uhr | Quelle blogs.msdn.microsoft.com

This post is part of a regular series of posts where the C++ product team here at Microsoft answers questions we have received from customers. The questions can be about anything C++ related: Visual C++, the standard language and library, the C++ standards committee, isocpp.org, CppCon, etc. Today’s Q&A is by Herb Sutter.

Question 

Reader @thesamhughescom recently asked: 

Has there ever been a consideration for allowing individual private functions to whitelist other classes or functions to call them? Similar to the per class friend method, I was thinking you could annotate a function with [[friend void foo(int)]] or [[friend class baz]] just an idea, I wouldn’t know where to get started on writing my own proposal, thanks Sam 

Answer 

There are occasionally proposals, but friend itself should be used very rarely so there’s not a lot of motivation to encourage it. 

One technique you can use today is to provide a set of friend helper types, each of which provides specific access to a given subset of things and can name its own friends, be handed out to callers, etc. That’s a flexible form of access control that works for granting different degrees of friendship statically to a set of types, granting access to some parts of the class’s interface dynamically to a set of callers, and so on. 

But the last part of your question is the easiest, and perhaps the most important: 

I wouldn’t know where to get started on writing my own proposal

Always (always, always, …) start with use cases. Write two or three concrete examples of the kind of code you want to write (initially pseudocode), explain clearly why you want to express it that way, and show the workarounds if any that are available for approximating it today. Compelling examples serve two major purposes: they motivate the feature (answer “why” questions like why have the features), and they also provide reference points to guide the feature’s design (answer “what” and “how” questions like what things the feature must be able to express and how it should be able to be used). 

 Your questions? 

If you have any question about C++ in general, please comment about it below. Someone in the community may answer it, or someone on our team may consider it for a future blog post. If instead your question is about support for a Microsoft product, you can provide feedback via Help > Report A Problem in the product, or via Developer Community. 


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Windows 10 SDK Preview Build 18282 available now!

Programmierung vom 20.11.2018 um 19:13 Uhr | Quelle blogs.windows.com

Today, we released a new Windows 10 Preview Build of the SDK to be used in conjunction with Windows 10 Insider Preview (Build 18282 or greater). The Preview SDK Build 18282 contains bug fixes and under development changes to the API surface area.

The Preview SDK can be downloaded from developer section on Windows Insider.

For feedback and updates to the known issues, please see the developer forum. For new developer feature requests, head over to our Windows Platform UserVoice.

Things to note:

  • This build works in conjunction with previously released SDKs and Visual Studio 2017. You can install this SDK and still also continue to submit your apps that target Windows 10 build 1809 or earlier to the Microsoft Store.
  • The Windows SDK will now formally only be supported by Visual Studio 2017 and greater. You can download the Visual Studio 2017 here.
  • This build of the Windows SDK will install on Windows 10 Insider Preview builds and supported Windows operating systems.
  • In order to assist with script access to the SDK, the ISO will also be able to be accessed through the following URL:  https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?prd=11966&pver=1.0&plcid=0x409&clcid=0x409&ar=Flight&sar=Sdsurl&o1=18282 once the static URL is published.

Breaking Changes

In this Preview SDK we’ll be adding a blend mode to the effect graph of the AcrylicBrush called Luminosity. This blend mode will ensure that shadows don’t appear behind acrylic surfaces without a cutout. We will also be exposing a LuminosityBlendOpacity API available for tweaking that allows for more AcrylicBrush customization.

By default, for those that have not specified any LuminosityBlendOpacity on their AcrylicBrushes, we have implemented some logic to ensure that the Acrylic will look as similar as it can to current 1809 acrylics. Please note that we will be updating our default brushes to account for this recipe change.

API Updates and Additions

Additions:

namespace Windows.ApplicationModel.AppService {
  public sealed class AppServiceConnection : IClosable {
    public static IAsyncOperation<StatelessAppServiceResponse> SendStatelessMessageAsync(AppServiceConnection connection, RemoteSystemConnectionRequest connectionRequest, ValueSet message);
  }
  public sealed class StatelessAppServiceResponse
  public enum StatelessAppServiceResponseStatus
}
namespace Windows.ApplicationModel.Calls {
  public sealed class PhoneLine {
    PhoneLineBluetoothDetails BluetoothDetails { get; }
    void EnableTextReply(bool value);
  }
  public sealed class PhoneLineBluetoothDetails
  public enum PhoneLineTransport {
    Bluetooth = 2,
  }
}
namespace Windows.ApplicationModel.Calls.Background {
  public enum PhoneIncomingCallDismissedReason
  public sealed class PhoneIncomingCallDismissedTriggerDetails
  public enum PhoneLineProperties : uint {
    BluetoothDetails = (uint)512,
  }
  public enum PhoneTriggerType {
    IncomingCallDismissed = 6,
  }
}
namespace Windows.ApplicationModel.Calls.Provider {
  public static class PhoneCallOriginManager {
    public static bool IsSupported { get; }
  }
}
namespace Windows.ApplicationModel.Resources.Core {
  public sealed class ResourceCandidate {
    ResourceCandidateKind Kind { get; }
  }
  public enum ResourceCandidateKind
}
namespace Windows.Devices.PointOfService {
  public sealed class JournalPrinterCapabilities : ICommonPosPrintStationCapabilities {
    bool IsReversePaperFeedByLineSupported { get; }
    bool IsReversePaperFeedByMapModeUnitSupported { get; }
    bool IsReverseVideoSupported { get; }
    bool IsStrikethroughSupported { get; }
    bool IsSubscriptSupported { get; }
    bool IsSuperscriptSupported { get; }
  }
  public sealed class JournalPrintJob : IPosPrinterJob {
    void FeedPaperByLine(int lineCount);
    void FeedPaperByMapModeUnit(int distance);
    void Print(string data, PosPrinterPrintOptions printOptions);
  }
  public sealed class PaymentDevice : IClosable
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceCapabilities
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceConfiguration
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceGetConfigurationResult
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceOperationResult
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceTransactionRequest
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceTransactionResult
  public sealed class PaymentMethod
  public enum PaymentMethodKind
  public enum PaymentOperationStatus
  public enum PaymentUserResponse
  public sealed class PosPrinter : IClosable {
    IVectorView<uint> SupportedBarcodeSymbologies { get; }
    PosPrinterFontProperty GetFontProperty(string typeface);
  }
  public sealed class PosPrinterFontProperty
  public sealed class PosPrinterPrintOptions
  public sealed class ReceiptPrinterCapabilities : ICommonPosPrintStationCapabilities, ICommonReceiptSlipCapabilities {
    bool IsReversePaperFeedByLineSupported { get; }
    bool IsReversePaperFeedByMapModeUnitSupported { get; }
    bool IsReverseVideoSupported { get; }
    bool IsStrikethroughSupported { get; }
    bool IsSubscriptSupported { get; }
    bool IsSuperscriptSupported { get; }
  }
  public sealed class ReceiptPrintJob : IPosPrinterJob, IReceiptOrSlipJob {
    void FeedPaperByLine(int lineCount);
    void FeedPaperByMapModeUnit(int distance);
    void Print(string data, PosPrinterPrintOptions printOptions);
    void StampPaper();
  }
  public struct SizeUInt32
  public sealed class SlipPrinterCapabilities : ICommonPosPrintStationCapabilities, ICommonReceiptSlipCapabilities {
    bool IsReversePaperFeedByLineSupported { get; }
    bool IsReversePaperFeedByMapModeUnitSupported { get; }
    bool IsReverseVideoSupported { get; }
    bool IsStrikethroughSupported { get; }
    bool IsSubscriptSupported { get; }
    bool IsSuperscriptSupported { get; }
  }
  public sealed class SlipPrintJob : IPosPrinterJob, IReceiptOrSlipJob {
    void FeedPaperByLine(int lineCount);
    void FeedPaperByMapModeUnit(int distance);
    void Print(string data, PosPrinterPrintOptions printOptions);
  }
}
namespace Windows.Devices.PointOfService.Provider {
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceCloseTerminalRequest
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceCloseTerminalRequestEventArgs
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceConfigurationReadRequest
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceConfigurationReadRequestEventArgs
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceConfigurationWriteRequest
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceConfigurationWriteRequestEventArgs
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceConnection : IClosable
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceConnectionTriggerDetails
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceConnectorInfo
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceGetTerminalsRequest
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceGetTerminalsRequestEventArgs
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceOpenTerminalRequest
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceOpenTerminalRequestEventArgs
  public sealed class PaymentDevicePaymentAuthorizationRequest
  public sealed class PaymentDevicePaymentAuthorizationRequestEventArgs
  public sealed class PaymentDevicePaymentRequest
  public sealed class PaymentDevicePaymentRequestEventArgs
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceReadCapabilitiesRequest
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceReadCapabilitiesRequestEventArgs
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceRefundRequest
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceRefundRequestEventArgs
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceVoidTokenRequest
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceVoidTokenRequestEventArgs
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceVoidTransactionRequest
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceVoidTransactionRequestEventArgs
}
namespace Windows.Globalization {
  public sealed class CurrencyAmount
}
namespace Windows.Management.Deployment {
  public enum AddPackageByAppInstallerOptions : uint {
    LimitToExistingPackages = (uint)512,
  }
  public enum DeploymentOptions : uint {
    RetainFilesOnFailure = (uint)2097152,
  }
}
namespace Windows.Media.Devices {
  public sealed class InfraredTorchControl
  public enum InfraredTorchMode
  public sealed class VideoDeviceController : IMediaDeviceController {
    InfraredTorchControl InfraredTorchControl { get; }
  }
}
namespace Windows.Networking.Connectivity {
  public enum NetworkAuthenticationType {
    Wpa3 = 10,
    Wpa3Sae = 11,
  }
}
namespace Windows.Networking.NetworkOperators {
  public sealed class ESim {
    ESimDiscoverResult Discover();
    ESimDiscoverResult Discover(string serverAddress, string matchingId);
    IAsyncOperation<ESimDiscoverResult> DiscoverAsync();
    IAsyncOperation<ESimDiscoverResult> DiscoverAsync(string serverAddress, string matchingId);
  }
  public sealed class ESimDiscoverEvent
  public sealed class ESimDiscoverResult
  public enum ESimDiscoverResultKind
}
namespace Windows.Security.DataProtection {
  public enum UserDataAvailability
  public sealed class UserDataAvailabilityStateChangedEventArgs
  public sealed class UserDataBufferUnprotectResult
  public enum UserDataBufferUnprotectStatus
  public sealed class UserDataProtectionManager
  public sealed class UserDataStorageItemProtectionInfo
  public enum UserDataStorageItemProtectionStatus
}
namespace Windows.System {
  public sealed class DispatcherQueue {
    bool HasThreadAccess { get; }
  }
  public enum ProcessorArchitecture {
    Arm64 = 12,
    X86OnArm64 = 14,
  }
}
namespace Windows.UI.Composition {
  public interface IVisualElement
}
namespace Windows.UI.Composition.Interactions {
  public enum InteractionBindingAxisModes : uint
  public sealed class InteractionTracker : CompositionObject {
    public static void SetBindingMode(InteractionTracker boundTracker1, InteractionTracker boundTracker2, InteractionBindingAxisModes axisMode);
  }
  public sealed class InteractionTrackerCustomAnimationStateEnteredArgs {
    bool IsFromBinding { get; }
  }
  public sealed class InteractionTrackerIdleStateEnteredArgs {
    bool IsFromBinding { get; }
  }
  public sealed class InteractionTrackerInertiaStateEnteredArgs {
    bool IsFromBinding { get; }
  }
  public sealed class InteractionTrackerInteractingStateEnteredArgs {
    bool IsFromBinding { get; }
  }
  public class VisualInteractionSource : CompositionObject, ICompositionInteractionSource {
    public static VisualInteractionSource CreateFromIVisualElement(IVisualElement source);
  }
}
namespace Windows.UI.Input {
  public class AttachableInputObject : IClosable
  public sealed class InputActivationListener : AttachableInputObject
  public sealed class InputActivationListenerActivationChangedEventArgs
  public enum InputActivationState
}
namespace Windows.UI.Input.Preview {
  public static class InputActivationListenerPreview
}
namespace Windows.UI.Input.Preview.Injection {
  public enum InjectedInputButtonEvent
  public sealed class InjectedInputButtonInfo
  public enum InjectedInputButtonKind
  public sealed class InputInjector {
    void InjectButtonInput(IIterable<InjectedInputButtonInfo> input);
  }
}
namespace Windows.UI.ViewManagement {
  public sealed class ApplicationView {
    ApplicationWindowPresenterKind AppliedPresenterKind { get; }
    string PersistedStateName { get; }
    public static IAsyncOperation<bool> ClearAllPersistedStateAsync();
    public static IAsyncOperation<bool> ClearPersistedStateAsync(string value);
    bool TrySetPersistedStateName(string value);
  }
  public sealed class UISettings {
    bool AutoHideScrollBars { get; }
    event TypedEventHandler<UISettings, UISettingsAutoHideScrollBarsChangedEventArgs> AutoHideScrollBarsChanged;
  }
  public sealed class UISettingsAutoHideScrollBarsChangedEventArgs
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml {
  public class ContentRoot
  public sealed class ContentRootRasterizationScaleChangedEventArgs
  public sealed class ContentRootSizeChangedEventArgs
  public sealed class ContentRootVisibilityChangedEventArgs
  public sealed class ContentRootVisibleBoundsChangedEventArgs
  public class UIElement : DependencyObject, IAnimationObject {
    Shadow Shadow { get; set; }
    public static DependencyProperty ShadowProperty { get; }
  }
  public class UIElementWeakCollection : IIterable<UIElement>, IVector<UIElement>
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Controls {
  public class ContentDialog : ContentControl {
    ContentRoot AssociatedContentRoot { get; set; }
  }
  public class RichEditBox : Control {
    void CopySelectionToClipboard();
    void CutSelectionToClipboard();
    void PasteFromClipboard();
  }
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Controls.Primitives {
  public sealed class AppBarTemplateSettings : DependencyObject {
    double NegativeCompactVerticalDelta { get; }
    double NegativeHiddenVerticalDelta { get; }
    double NegativeMinimalVerticalDelta { get; }
  }
  public sealed class CommandBarTemplateSettings : DependencyObject {
    double OverflowContentCompactOpenUpDelta { get; }
    double OverflowContentHiddenOpenUpDelta { get; }
    double OverflowContentMinimalOpenUpDelta { get; }
  }
  public class FlyoutBase : DependencyObject {
    ContentRoot AssociatedContentRoot { get; set; }
    bool IsConstrainedToRootBounds { get; }
    bool ShouldConstrainToRootBounds { get; set; }
    public static DependencyProperty ShouldConstrainToRootBoundsProperty { get; }
  }
  public sealed class Popup : FrameworkElement {
    ContentRoot AssociatedContentRoot { get; set; }
    bool IsConstrainedToRootBounds { get; }
    bool ShouldConstrainToRootBounds { get; set; }
    public static DependencyProperty ShouldConstrainToRootBoundsProperty { get; }
  }
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Core.Direct {
  public enum XamlPropertyIndex {
    AppBarTemplateSettings_NegativeCompactVerticalDelta = 2367,
    AppBarTemplateSettings_NegativeHiddenVerticalDelta = 2368,
    AppBarTemplateSettings_NegativeMinimalVerticalDelta = 2369,
    CommandBarTemplateSettings_OverflowContentCompactOpenUpDelta = 2370,
    CommandBarTemplateSettings_OverflowContentHiddenOpenUpDelta = 2371,
    CommandBarTemplateSettings_OverflowContentMinimalOpenUpDelta = 2372,
    FlyoutBase_ShouldConstrainToRootBounds = 2378,
    Popup_ShouldConstrainToRootBounds = 2379,
  }
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Hosting {
  public class DesktopWindowXamlSource : IClosable {
    bool ProcessKeyboardAccelerator(VirtualKey key, VirtualKeyModifiers modifiers);
  }
  public sealed class ElementCompositionPreview {
    public static UIElement GetApplicationWindowContent(ApplicationWindow applicationWindow);
    public static void SetApplicationWindowContent(ApplicationWindow applicationWindow, UIElement xamlContent);
  }
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Input {
  public sealed class FocusManager {
    public static UIElement FindNextFocusableElementInContentRoot(FocusNavigationDirection focusNavigationDirection, ContentRoot contentRoot);
    public static UIElement FindNextFocusableElementInContentRoot(FocusNavigationDirection focusNavigationDirection, ContentRoot contentRoot, Rect hintRect);
    public static object GetFocusedElement(ContentRoot contentRoot);
    public static bool TryMoveFocusInContentRoot(FocusNavigationDirection focusNavigationDirection, ContentRoot contentRoot);
    public static IAsyncOperation<FocusMovementResult> TryMoveFocusInContentRootAsync(FocusNavigationDirection focusNavigationDirection, ContentRoot contentRoot);
  }
  public class StandardUICommand : XamlUICommand {
    StandardUICommandKind Kind { get; set; }
  }
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Media {
  public class Shadow : DependencyObject
  public class ThemeShadow : Shadow
  public sealed class VisualTreeHelper {
    public static IVectorView<Popup> GetOpenPopupsWithinContentRoot(ContentRoot contentRoot);
  }
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Media.Animation {
  public class GravityConnectedAnimationConfiguration : ConnectedAnimationConfiguration {
    bool IsShadowEnabled { get; set; }
  }
}
namespace Windows.Web.Http {
  public sealed class HttpClient : IClosable, IStringable {
    IAsyncOperationWithProgress<HttpRequestResult, HttpProgress> TryDeleteAsync(Uri uri);
    IAsyncOperationWithProgress<HttpRequestResult, HttpProgress> TryGetAsync(Uri uri);
    IAsyncOperationWithProgress<HttpRequestResult, HttpProgress> TryGetAsync(Uri uri, HttpCompletionOption completionOption);
    IAsyncOperationWithProgress<HttpGetBufferResult, HttpProgress> TryGetBufferAsync(Uri uri);
    IAsyncOperationWithProgress<HttpGetInputStreamResult, HttpProgress> TryGetInputStreamAsync(Uri uri);
    IAsyncOperationWithProgress<HttpGetStringResult, HttpProgress> TryGetStringAsync(Uri uri);
    IAsyncOperationWithProgress<HttpRequestResult, HttpProgress> TryPostAsync(Uri uri, IHttpContent content);
    IAsyncOperationWithProgress<HttpRequestResult, HttpProgress> TryPutAsync(Uri uri, IHttpContent content);
    IAsyncOperationWithProgress<HttpRequestResult, HttpProgress> TrySendRequestAsync(HttpRequestMessage request);
    IAsyncOperationWithProgress<HttpRequestResult, HttpProgress> TrySendRequestAsync(HttpRequestMessage request, HttpCompletionOption completionOption);
  }
  public sealed class HttpGetBufferResult : IClosable, IStringable
  public sealed class HttpGetInputStreamResult : IClosable, IStringable
  public sealed class HttpGetStringResult : IClosable, IStringable
  public sealed class HttpRequestResult : IClosable, IStringable
}
 

The post Windows 10 SDK Preview Build 18282 available now! appeared first on Windows Developer Blog.


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Windows Template Studio 2.5 released!

Programmierung vom 20.11.2018 um 18:00 Uhr | Quelle blogs.windows.com

We’re extremely excited to announce the Windows Template Studio 2.5!

As always, we love how the community is helping. If you’re interested, please head over to head over to WTS’s Github.

What’s new:

Full list of adjustments in the 2.5 release, WTS’s Github has a full changelog.

Windows Template Studio 2.5

Included in this version:

  • Improved startup time splitting templates by platform/language
  • Improved guidance on Suspend and Resume feature
  • Support for VS 2019
  • Bug fixes
  • Navigation View uses WinUI Library
  • Pages updated with current Fluent guidance

Recently added in prior versions:

  • Multiple Ink pages
  • Data Grid from Windows Community Toolkit page

Dev platform updates:

  • Updated target platform version to 10.0.17763.0 and min target version to 10.0.17134.0
  • Updated Microsoft.NETCore.UniversalWindowsPlatform to 6.1.9
  • AdaptiveCards to 1.1.0
  • AppCenter.Analytics and Microsoft.AppCenter.Crashes to 1.10.0
  • UI.for.UniversalWindowsPlatform 1.0.1.2
  • MVVMLight to 5.4.1.1
  • Windows Community Toolkit to 5.0.0

How to get the update:

There are two paths to update to the newest build.

  • Already installed: Visual Studio should auto update the extension. To force an update, Go to Tools->Extensions and Updates. Then go to Update expander on the left and you should see Windows Template Studio in there and click “Update.”
  • Not installed: Head to https://aka.ms/wtsinstall, click “download” and double click the VSIX installer.

What else is cooking for next versions?

We love all the community support and participation. In addition, here are just a few of the things we are currently building out that will be in future builds:

  • Work for supporting multiple projects in a single solution
  • Menubar navigation pattern template
  • Identity Login
  • Improved Visual Studio 2019 support
  • Adaptive Grid page
  • Azure features starting to be added in

With partnership with the community, we will continue cranking out and iterating new features and functionality. We’re always looking for additional people to help out and if you’re interested, please head to our GitHub at https://aka.ms/wts. If you have an idea or feature request, please make it here!

The post Windows Template Studio 2.5 released! appeared first on Windows Developer Blog.


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Secure password-less sign-in for your Microsoft account using a security key or Windows Hello

Programmierung vom 20.11.2018 um 18:00 Uhr | Quelle microsoft.com

Howdy folks,

I’m so excited to share today’s news! We just turned on the ability to securely sign in with your Microsoft account using a standards-based FIDO2 compatible device—no username or password required! FIDO2 enables users to leverage standards-based devices to easily authenticate to online services—in both mobile and desktop environments.

This combination of ease of use, security, and broad industry support is going to be transformational both at home and in the modern workplace. Every month, more than 800 million people use a Microsoft account to create, connect, and share from anywhere to Outlook, Office, OneDrive, Bing, Skype, and Xbox Live for work and play. And now they can all benefit from this simple user experience and greatly improved security.

Starting today, you can use a FIDO2 device or Windows Hello to sign in to your Microsoft account using the Microsoft Edge browser.

Watch this quick video showing how it works:

Microsoft has been on a mission to eliminate passwords and help people protect their data and accounts from threats. As a member of the Fast Identity Online (FIDO) Alliance and the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), we’ve been working with others to develop open standards for the next generation of authentication. I’m happy to share that Microsoft is the first Fortune 500 company to support password-less authentication using the the WebAuthn and FIDO2 specifications, and Microsoft Edge supports the widest array of authenticators compared to other major browsers.

If you want to know more details on how it works and how to get started, keep reading on.

Get started

To sign in with your Microsoft Account using a FIDO2 security key:

  1. If you haven’t already, make sure you update to Windows 10 October 2018.
  2. Go to the Microsoft account page on Microsoft Edge and sign in as you normally would.
  3. Select Security More security options and under Windows Hello and security keys, you’ll see instructions for setting up a security key. (You can purchase a security key from one of our partners, including Yubico and Feitian Technologies that support the FIDO2 standard.*)
  4. Next time you sign in, you can either click More Options > Use a security key or type in your username. At that point, you’ll be asked to use a security key to sign in.

And as a reminder, here’s how to sign in with your Microsoft account using Windows Hello:

  1. Make sure you’ve updated to Windows 10 October 2018.
  2. If you haven’t already, you’ll need to set up Windows Hello. If you have Windows Hello set up, you’re good to go!
  3. Next time you sign in on Microsoft Edge, you can either click More Options > Use Windows Hello or a security key or type in your username. At that point, you’ll be asked to use Windows Hello or a security to sign in.

If you need more help, check out our detailed help article about how to get set up.

*There are a couple of optional features in the FIDO2 spec that we believe are fundamental to security, so only keys that have implemented those features will work. Read What is a Microsoft-compatible security key? to learn more.

How does it work?

Under the covers, we implemented the WebAuthn and FIDO2 CTAP2 specifications into our services to make this a reality.

Unlike passwords, FIDO2 protects user credentials using public/private key encryption. When you create and register a FIDO2 credential, the device (your PC or the FIDO2 device) generates a private and public key on the device. The private key is stored securely on the device and can only be used after it has been unlocked using a local gesture like biometric or PIN. Note that your biometric or PIN never leaves the device. At the same time that the private key is stored, the public key is sent to the Microsoft account system in the cloud and registered with your user account.

When you later sign in, the Microsoft account system provides a nonce to your PC or FIDO2 device. Your PC or device then uses the private key to sign the nonce. The signed nonce and metadata is sent back to the Microsoft account system, where it is verified using the public key. The signed metadata as specified by the WebAuthn and FIDO2 specs provides information, such as whether the user was present, and verifies the authentication through the local gesture. It’s these properties that make authentication with Windows Hello and FIDO2 devices not “phishable” or easily stolen by malware.

How do Windows Hello and FIDO2 devices implement this? Based on the capabilities of your Windows 10 device, you will either have a built-in secure enclave, known as a hardware trusted platform module (TPM) or a software TPM. The TPM stores the private key, which requires either your face, fingerprint, or PIN to unlock it. Similarly, a FIDO2 device, like a security key, is a small external device with its own built-in secure enclave that stores the private key and requires the biometric or PIN to unlock it. Both options offer two-factor authentication in one step, requiring both a registered device and a biometric or PIN to successfully sign in.

Check out this article on our Identity Standards blog, which goes into all the technical details around the implementation.

What’s next

We have tons of great things coming out as part of our efforts to reduce and even eliminate the use of passwords. We are currently building the same sign-in experience from a browser with security keys for work and school accounts in Azure Active Directory. Enterprise customers will be able to preview this early next year, where they will be able to allow their employees to set up their own security keys for their account to sign in to Windows 10 and the cloud.

Furthermore, as more browsers and platforms start supporting the WebAuthn and FIDO2 standards, the password-less experience—available on Microsoft Edge and Windows today—will be hopefully available everywhere!

Stay tuned for more details early next year!

Best Regards,
Alex Simons (@Twitter: @Alex_A_Simons)
CVP of Program Management
Microsoft Identity Division

The post Secure password-less sign-in for your Microsoft account using a security key or Windows Hello appeared first on Microsoft 365 Blog.


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Applying Object Character Recognition And Kubernetes To Twitch

Programmierung vom 20.11.2018 um 18:00 Uhr | Quelle youtube.com

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Getting Started with Windows Machine Learning

Programmierung vom 20.11.2018 um 17:15 Uhr | Quelle blogs.windows.com

With the Windows 10 October 2018 Update, Windows Machine Learning is out of preview and ready to become part of your AI toolbox. The Windows ML inference engine evaluates trained models locally on Windows devices, removing concerns of connectivity, bandwidth, and data privacy. This video series will help you understand how you can get started with Windows ML and explore the new APIs through the lens of Rufus the robot.

Overview of Windows Machine Learning

What is Windows Machine Learning and why should you care? Killian and Rosane walk through these questions and clarify the positioning and capabilities of this powerful AI inference engine.

Windows Machine Learning: Hello World (MNIST Edition)

Let’s jump to the code! Killian and Rosane work through the Windows ML MNIST tutorial and answer questions developers commonly ask along the way.

Windows Machine Learning: Models and Features

Killian and Rosane (with guest star Rufus!) discuss loading models and understanding how to determine a given model’s expected inputs and output features.

Windows Machine Learning: Device Selection

Killian and Paul (and our robot friend Rufus!) go over how to select a device to run Windows ML model evaluation and uncover what the default option really means.

Windows Machine Learning: Sessions and Bindings

Killian and Paul (and ROS-powered Rufus!) are ready to show you how to evaluate a model with Windows ML, but not before they cover the importance of sessions and bindings to get there.

Providing Feedback & Staying Informed

What Windows ML topics should we cover next? Let us know what you think by tweeting (and following) @killianqueue!

The post Getting Started with Windows Machine Learning appeared first on Windows Developer Blog.


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MariaDB 10.3.11, and MariaDB Connector/C 3.0.7, Connector/ODBC 3.0.7 and Connector/Node.js 2.0.1 now available

Programmierung vom 20.11.2018 um 15:43 Uhr | Quelle mariadb.org

The MariaDB Foundation is pleased to announce the availability of MariaDB 10.3.11, the latest stable release in the MariaDB 10.3 series, as well as MariaDB Connector/C 3.0.7 and MariaDB Connector/ODBC 3.0.7, both stable releases, and MariaDB Connector/Node.js 2.0.1, the first beta release of the new 100% JavaScript non-blocking MariaDB client for Node.js, compatible with Node.js […]

The post MariaDB 10.3.11, and MariaDB Connector/C 3.0.7, Connector/ODBC 3.0.7 and Connector/Node.js 2.0.1 now available appeared first on MariaDB.org.


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Introducing Azure DevOps Server 2019 RC1

Programmierung vom 20.11.2018 um 15:00 Uhr | Quelle azure.microsoft.com

Today we're excited to share the first release candidate (RC) of Azure DevOps Server 2019. Azure DevOps Server 2019 delivers the codebase of Microsoft Azure DevOps while being optimized for customers who prefer to self-host. This may be the case for some customers because they require Azure DevOps run on-premises, they require a guaranteed isolated instance of Azure DevOps, or because they want to run in regions where a hosted version of Azure DevOps is not available.

You can download Azure DevOps Server 2019 RC1 today.

Like the evolution of Team Foundation Server (TFS), Azure DevOps Server includes the new, fast, and clean Azure DevOps user interface with a multitude of new features. We’ll discuss some of the most beneficial features for our customers below, but you can check out our extensive release notes for all the features and information included in this initial release.

Added support for Azure SQL

Azure DevOps Server includes support for Azure SQL in addition to existing SQL Server support. This enables enterprises to self-host Azure DevOps in their own datacenter using an on-premises SQL Server. Customers now also have the option to self-host Azure DevOps in the cloud and take advantage of all the fantastic Azure SQL capabilities and performance. With this release, Azure DevOps now provides best in class hybrid-cloud development collaboration capabilities allowing customers to install on-premises, self-host in the cloud, or use the globally available Microsoft hosted service to take advantage of automatic updates and automatic scaling.

Release management improvements

With Azure DevOps Server 2019 the new release management interface is also available, making it easier than ever to see how your deployment is going. The unique end-to-end traceability in Azure DevOps allows you to easily understand which bits are deployed to which environments and why. You can also mix and match agents self-hosted on-premises and in any cloud on Windows, Mac, or Linux . You can easily deploy to IaaS or PaaS in Azure as well as on-premises infrastructure.

Screenshot of the improved Azure Pipelines interface while tracking a release to production using progressive exposure

While the new navigation and improved user experience in Azure DevOps has undergone significant testing and feedback in our hosted service, we recognize that for self-hosting customers the new navigation model may require updates to internal documentation and training. Therefore, you should plan accordingly because once you do the upgrade all your Azure DevOps Server users will see the new UI. Previous versions of Team Foundation Server will stay on the old user interface.

Upgrading and licensing

To get more information see the Azure DevOps Server requirements and compatibility page to get on the dependencies required for your self-hosted installation. If you are able to run TFS 2018 you can easily upgrade to Azure DevOps Server, as we will continue all operating systems and SQL Server support in this release.

A direct upgrade to Azure DevOps Server is supported from any version of TFS, which includes Team Foundation Server 2012 and newer. If your TFS deployment is on TFS 2010 or earlier, you will need to perform some interim steps before upgrading to Azure DevOps Server 2019. Please see the install page for more information.

While Azure DevOps Server 2019 RC1 includes a go-live license making it suitable for production use today, we are keen to get your feedback regarding Azure DevOps running in a self-hosted configuration, either on-premises or in the cloud. We’d also love to get feedback from people upgrading their TFS instances to Azure DevOps Server.

If you have questions or feedback please let us know via the Azure DevOps developer community site.

Resources


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Introducing Azure DevOps Server 2019 RC1

Programmierung vom 20.11.2018 um 15:00 Uhr | Quelle azure.microsoft.com

Today we're excited to share the first release candidate (RC) of Azure DevOps Server 2019. Azure DevOps Server 2019 delivers the codebase of Microsoft Azure DevOps while being optimized for customers who prefer to self-host. This may be the case for some customers because they require Azure DevOps run on-premises, they require a guaranteed isolated instance of Azure DevOps, or because they want to run in regions where a hosted version of Azure DevOps is not available.

You can download Azure DevOps Server 2019 RC1 today.

Like the evolution of Team Foundation Server (TFS), Azure DevOps Server includes the new, fast, and clean Azure DevOps user interface with a multitude of new features. We’ll discuss some of the most beneficial features for our customers below, but you can check out our extensive release notes for all the features and information included in this initial release.

Added support for Azure SQL

Azure DevOps Server includes support for Azure SQL in addition to existing SQL Server support. This enables enterprises to self-host Azure DevOps in their own datacenter using an on-premises SQL Server. Customers now also have the option to self-host Azure DevOps in the cloud and take advantage of all the fantastic Azure SQL capabilities and performance. With this release, Azure DevOps now provides best in class hybrid-cloud development collaboration capabilities allowing customers to install on-premises, self-host in the cloud, or use the globally available Microsoft hosted service to take advantage of automatic updates and automatic scaling.

Release management improvements

With Azure DevOps Server 2019 the new release management interface is also available, making it easier than ever to see how your deployment is going. The unique end-to-end traceability in Azure DevOps allows you to easily understand which bits are deployed to which environments and why. You can also mix and match agents self-hosted on-premises and in any cloud on Windows, Mac, or Linux . You can easily deploy to IaaS or PaaS in Azure as well as on-premises infrastructure.

Screenshot of the improved Azure Pipelines interface while tracking a release to production using progressive exposure

While the new navigation and improved user experience in Azure DevOps has undergone significant testing and feedback in our hosted service, we recognize that for self-hosting customers the new navigation model may require updates to internal documentation and training. Therefore, you should plan accordingly because once you do the upgrade all your Azure DevOps Server users will see the new UI. Previous versions of Team Foundation Server will stay on the old user interface.

Upgrading and licensing

To get more information see the Azure DevOps Server requirements and compatibility page to get on the dependencies required for your self-hosted installation. If you are able to run TFS 2018 you can easily upgrade to Azure DevOps Server, as we will continue all operating systems and SQL Server support in this release.

A direct upgrade to Azure DevOps Server is supported from any version of TFS, which includes Team Foundation Server 2012 and newer. If your TFS deployment is on TFS 2010 or earlier, you will need to perform some interim steps before upgrading to Azure DevOps Server 2019. Please see the install page for more information.

While Azure DevOps Server 2019 RC1 includes a go-live license making it suitable for production use today, we are keen to get your feedback regarding Azure DevOps running in a self-hosted configuration, either on-premises or in the cloud. We’d also love to get feedback from people upgrading their TFS instances to Azure DevOps Server.

If you have questions or feedback please let us know via the Azure DevOps developer community site.

Resources


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Update für Windows 10 SDK mit Visual Studio 15.9.1 erhältlich

Programmierung vom 20.11.2018 um 14:34 Uhr | Quelle microsoft.com
Entwickler erhalten mit Visual Studio 15.9.1 ein Update für das Software Development Kit "Windows 10 SDK". Die neue Version erleichtert den Einstieg in die Windows Machine Learning API und wartet mit Neuheiten in den Bereichen Windows UI Library (WinUI), UWP XAML hosting API (Preview), Adaptive Cards 1.1, Graph Notifications (Preview), Project Ink Analysis und Hyper-V auf. Das neue Update enthält: Mit der ...
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Understanding health criteria in Azure Monitor for VMs

Programmierung vom 20.11.2018 um 12:00 Uhr | Quelle azure.microsoft.com

Azure Monitor for virtual machines (VMs) offers a myriad of monitoring features that help you view VMs from various perspectives. A few of those perspectives are:

  1. The health of the VM and its components. This helps you to monitor, diagnose, and localize issues in operating systems, core components, and services such as Domain Name System (DNS), Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), and more. Also, it identifies performance issues with CPU, memory, disk, and network adapter on your VMs.
  2. Performance trends. These trends show you the performance with CPU, memory, disk, and network adapter performance metrics over time. 
  3. Maps - Connection topology and metrics. This gives you a visual map that shows the processes running on your VMs and the interaction between them, as well as important events and alerts.

Azure Monitor for VMs evaluates a various canned set of conditions called health criteria on your VMs in near real-time and triggers an alert if any health criterion goes to critical/warning state (alerts are turned on by default, but you can alter the behavior). For example, if the CPU utilization health criterion is in a critical state, an alert titled “CPU utilization too high” will fire. You can manage the health alerts just like you manage any other alert in Azure Monitor in the Alerts pivot in the portal.

You no longer have to worry about creating alerts for each health criteria. For a full list of each criterion, read the documentation, "Understand the health of your Azure virtual machines with Azure Monitor for VMs (Preview)."

Available Megabytes of Memory

To understand if health criteria fires an alert or not, simply click on the health criteria link from per VM experiences to view its configuration.

Leveraging the APIs

While you can use Azure portal for most of the tasks related to health monitoring for VMs, there are certain properties and configurations that are only accessible through the APIs. In addition, you may want to use APIs to automate some of the tasks. Let’s take a tour of the APIs and see how you can leverage them for specific scenarios.

1. To identify what health criteria are applicable or active on a particular VM, and to get their IDs that are required for other API-related operations, use the following GET API example leveraging ARM client on command prompt shown below.

GET API example leveraging ARM client on command

"subscriptions/Subscription_Name/resourceGroups/Resource_Group_Name/providers/Microsoft.Compute/virtualMachines/VM_Name/providers/Microsoft.WorkloadMonitor/monitors?api-version=2018-08-31-preview”

2. Updates to health states are governed by two additional parameters, frequency and lookback period. Frequency is the rate at which a health criterion is executed, and lookback is the duration over which is a criterion is evaluated. For example, if health criterion is evaluating the condition CPU utilization is greater than 95 percent with frequency of 5 minutes and a lookback duration of 15 minutes. This means that the condition whether CPU utilization is greater than 95 percent is evaluated every 5 minutes, but if it remains greater than 95 percent for 15 minutes (3 consecutive evaluation cycles), then the state will be updated to critical if it wasn’t already.

Currently, frequency and lookback period are not exposed in the UI. However, you can get these values using the API. Shown below is an example leveraging ARM client on command prompt.

An example leveraging ARM client on command

"subscriptions/Subscription_Name/resourceGroups/Resource_Group_Name/providers/Microsoft.Compute/virtualMachines/VM_Name/providers/Microsoft.WorkloadMonitor/monitors/Monitor_ID?api-version=2018-08-31-preview”

Note: Modification of frequency and Lookback period isn’t available today.

3. Enabling or disabling an alert on a health criterion. For example, if alerting is enabled on a health criterion and you would like to disable it, the following expression could be used.

armclient patch 

“subscriptions/Subscription_Name/resourceGroups/Resource_Group_Name/providers/Microsoft.Compute/virtualMachines/VM_Name/providers/Microsoft.WorkloadMonitor/monitors/Monitor_ID?api-version=2018-08-31-preview 1-preview "{'properties':{'alertGeneration':’Disabled’ }}"

4. Updating the threshold of a Health Criteria.

armclient patch

subscriptions/Subscription_Name/resourceGroups/Resource_Group_Name/providers/Microsoft.Compute/virtualMachines/VM_Name/providers/Microsoft.WorkloadMonitor/monitors/Monitor_ID?api-version=2018-08-31-preview 1-preview "{'properties':{'Threshold':’Desired_Value’ }}"

After making the desired edits you can use the GET API highlighted in point No. 2 above to understand whether the configuration updated. You can even validate it from the portal.

5. To associating Action group(s) with any of a VM’s health criteria.

Create a file titled “file_name” and update its extension to “.json”.

Its contents should look like this:

{

                "ActionGroupResourceIds": [“Action_Group_Resource_ID"]

                }  

Use the following PUT API to associate action group to a VM (for health alerts triggered by Azure Monitor for VMs).

armclient PUT

"subscriptions/Subscription_Name/resourceGroups/Resource_Group_Name/providers/Microsoft.Compute/virtualMachines/VM_Name/providers/Microsoft.WorkloadMonitor/notificationSettings?api-version=2018-08-31-preview"  @file_name.json (JSON Script)

To check whether the setting updated correctly, use the following GET API.

armclient GET

"subscriptions/Subscription_Name/resourceGroups/Resource_Group_Name/providers/Microsoft.Compute/virtualMachines/VM_Name/providers/Microsoft.WorkloadMonitor/notificationSettings?api-version=2018-08-31-preview"

To explore the API surface further, look at the swagger published on GitHub.


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Connect devices from other IoT clouds to Azure IoT Central

Programmierung vom 20.11.2018 um 10:00 Uhr | Quelle azure.microsoft.com

In this post let’s talk about the new Azure IoT Central device bridge. Whether you are using asset tracking devices hooked up to Sigfox’s Low Power Wide Area Network, or using air quality monitoring devices on the Particle Device Cloud, or using soil moisture monitoring devices on TTN, you can now directly leverage the power of IoT Central using the IoT Central device bridge. The device bridge connects other IoT clouds such as from Sigfox, Particle and The Things Network with IoT Central by forwarding the data your devices send to the other clouds through to your IoT Central app. In your IoT Central app, you can build rules and run analytics on that data, create workflows in Microsoft Flow and Azure Logic apps, export that data, and much more.

What is it and how does it work?

The IoT Central device bridge is an open source solution in Github. It is ready to go with a “Deploy to Azure” button that deploys a custom Azure Resource Manager (ARM) template with several Azure resources into your Azure subscription.

The resources include:

  • Azure Function app
  • Azure Storage account
  • App Service plan (S1 tier)
  • Azure Key Vault

The function app is the critical piece of the device bridge. It receives HTTP POST requests from other IoT platforms or any custom platforms via a simple webhook integration. We have provided examples that show how to connect to Sigfox, Particle, and TTN clouds. You can easily extend this solution to connect with your custom IoT cloud if your platform can send HTTP POST requests to your function app.

The function app transforms the data into a format accepted by IoT Central and forwards it along via DPS APIs.

IoT integration command code in the functions app

If your IoT Central app recognizes the device by device ID in the forwarded message, a new measurement will appear for that device. If the device ID has never been seen by your IoT Central app, your function app will attempt to register a new device with that device ID and it will appear as an “Unassociated device” in your IoT Central app.

How do I set it up?

The instructions are in a detailed list located in the README file on Github repo.

Next steps

Using the IoT Central device bridge is a simple and customizable way to forward messages from other IoT clouds to your IoT Central app. You can use this to quickly benefit from IoT Central with a pre-existing IoT solution that may already have a fleet of devices connected to it. The open source code can be found on this Github repo. Have feedback or questions? Don’t hesitate to write us at [email protected].

To explore the full set of features and capabilities start your free trial and learn more on the IoT Central website. Check out our documentation including tutorials to connect your first device.

To learn more about the Azure IoT portfolio including the latest news, visit the Microsoft Azure IoT page.


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Azure Marketplace new offers – Volume 25

Programmierung vom 20.11.2018 um 09:00 Uhr | Quelle azure.microsoft.com

We continue to expand the Azure Marketplace ecosystem. From October 16 to October 31, 2018, 49 new offers successfully met the onboarding criteria and went live. See details of the new offers below:

Virtual machines

Astadia UI Automation Test Engineering Environment

Astadia UI Automation Test Engineering Environment: Astadia's UI Automation TEE integrates all the tools you need to deliver a proven automated testing platform for your browser-based applications. Grow your team from one to hundreds and eliminate testing bottlenecks.

NEC EXPRESSCLUSTER X HA-DR Software

NEC EXPRESSCLUSTER X HA/DR Software: This integrated solution for business continuity and disaster recovery with high availability protects your IT system.

Neo4j Enterprise VM

Neo4j Enterprise VM: The Neo4j graph platform helps organizations make sense of their data by revealing how people, processes, and digital systems are interrelated.

nio IoT Platform

nio IoT Platform: This is a running instance of the nio distributed IoT development platform with an embedded Pubkeeper server.

Office 365 Backup

Office 365 Backup: CloudAlly’s cloud-to-cloud backup solution for the complete Microsoft cloud suite provides a simple, automated, and secure backup of your critical Microsoft business data.

Panzura Freedom CloudFS 7.1.6.13549

Panzura Freedom CloudFS 7.1.6.13549: Panzura Freedom Filer is a hybrid cloud data management solution that enables global enterprise customers to consolidate their unstructured data into Microsoft Azure.

Semperis Active Directory Forest Recovery

Semperis Active Directory Forest Recovery: With Semperis, you can recover quickly and confidently from even the most catastrophic Active Directory disaster. Semperis prevents malware reintroduction during restore and automates the forest recovery process.

Spotlight Enterprise 12.3

Spotlight Enterprise 12.3: Quest's Spotlight Enterprise 12.3 offers 24/7 monitoring and diagnostics to optimize SQL Server performance.

SQL Server 2016 SP2 Web w VulnerabilityAssessment

SQL Server 2016 SP2 Web w/ VulnerabilityAssessment: This image includes many database engine features and performance improvements. Utilities like SQL vulnerability assessment through SQL Server Management Studio, VS Code, and FTP client have been provided.

Unifi Data Catalog

Unifi Data Catalog: Unifi Data Catalog is a stand-alone enterprise-grade data catalog complete with intuitive natural language search powered by AI and collaboration capabilities for crowd-sourced data quality.

WorkiQ Real-Time Workforce Test Drive

WorkiQ® Real-Time Workforce Test Drive: WorkiQ by OpenConnect is real-time workforce analytics software that captures the task activity of your workforce.

Web applications

Abantecart on CentOS 7.3

Abantecart on CentOS 7.3: AbanteCart is a free, PHP-based e-commerce solution that enables merchants to quickly create online businesses and sell products online.

Abantecart on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

Abantecart on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS: AbanteCart is a free, PHP-based e-commerce solution that enables merchants to quickly create online businesses and sell products online.

anynode - The Software SBC

anynode - The Software SBC: anynode's Software SBC works with Skype for Business and Microsoft Teams. A session border controller is used if signaling and media flows between two separate VoIP networks need to be established, transmitted, and terminated.

Artifactory on centos 7.3

Artifactory on centos 7.3: Artifactory is a binary repository manager and version control for your binary artifacts (JAR/WAR files). Artifactory is also a place where you can put a shared library so that it's easily accessible across the enterprise.

Artifactory on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS - Auto Updates

Artifactory on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS - Auto Updates: Artifactory is a binary repository manager and version control for your binary artifacts (JAR/WAR files). Artifactory is also a place where you can put a shared library so that it's easily accessible across the enterprise.

BlueCat Address Manager for Azure

BlueCat Address Manager for Azure: BlueCat Address Manager for Azure enables IP address management capabilities in Azure, providing an authoritative source of information about the network.

CakePHP on CentOS 7.3

CakePHP on CentOS 7.3: CakePHP makes building web applications simpler, faster, and less code-intensive. CakePHP is a rapid development framework for PHP that uses commonly known design patterns like Active Record, Front Controller, and MVC.

CakePHP on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

CakePHP on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS: CakePHP makes building web applications simpler, faster, and less code-intensive. CakePHP is a rapid development framework for PHP that uses commonly known design patterns like Active Record, Front Controller, and MVC.

Citrix SD-WAN WAN Optimisation

Citrix SD-WAN WAN Optimisation: Citrix SD-WAN WAN Optimisation helps build hybrid clouds across enterprise datacenters and public clouds.

CMS Made Simple on centos

CMS Made Simple on centos: CMS Made Simple is an open-source package built using PHP that provides website developers with a simple, easy-to-use utility to build semi-static websites.

Codiad on Centos

Codiad on Centos: Codiad is an open-source web-based IDE framework written in Javascript. It includes a powerful multitabs ASCII text editor with language syntax highlighting and a file tree explorer. Codiad allows for fast, interactive development.

Codiad on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

Codiad on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS: Codiad is an open-source web-based IDE framework written in Javascript. It includes a powerful multitabs ASCII text editor with language syntax highlighting and a file tree explorer. Codiad allows for fast, interactive development.

Concrete5 on centos 7.3

Concrete5 on centos 7.3: Concrete5 is an open-source content management system for publishing. Concrete5 was designed for users with a minimum of technical skills, and it provides version management for every page, similar to wiki software.

Concrete5 on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

Concrete5 on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS: Concrete5 is an open-source content management system for publishing. Concrete5 was designed for users with a minimum of technical skills, and it provides version management for every page, similar to wiki software.

Coppermine on centos

Coppermine on centos: Coppermine is free software made for online galleries and image sharing. Coppermine supports template changes, user management, automatic thumbnail creation, and filmstrip and e-card features.

Coppermine on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

Coppermine on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS: Coppermine is free software made for online galleries and image sharing. Coppermine supports template changes, user management, automatic thumbnail creation, and filmstrip and e-card features.

Corda Custom Network Map

Corda Custom Network Map: This is a one-click solution template to deploy a custom implementation of the Corda Network Map protocol.

CrushFTP on CentOS 7.3

CrushFTP on CentOS 7.3: CrushFTP is a powerful, easy-to-configure file server supporting standard secure file transfer protocols. Its web interface enables file transfers via a web browser and allows customized messages and forms to be displayed.

CrushFTP on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

CrushFTP on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS: CrushFTP is a powerful, easy-to-configure file server supporting standard secure file transfer protocols. Its web interface enables file transfers via a web browser and allows customized messages and forms to be displayed.

Django on CentOS 7.3

Django on CentOS 7.3: Django is a free and open-source web framework written in Python that follows the model-view-controller (MVC) architectural pattern. Django's primary goal is to ease the creation of complex, database-driven websites.

Exact Synergy

Exact Synergy: Exact Synergy is the process technology platform that Exact HRM, CRM, and BPM are built on. New customers buy the technology via one of the complete solutions. Existing customers can extend their Synergy license with additional users and add-on solutions.

Haproxy on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

Haproxy on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS: Haproxy is an open-source TCP/HTTP load-balancing proxy server supporting native SSL protocol, HTTP keep-alive connections, compression, custom log formats, and header rewriting.

HPCBOX- HPC Cluster for Docker

HPCBOX: HPC Cluster for Docker: Run Docker containers on our HPC cloud platform. MPI, OpenGL, and CUDA applications can be pulled in as Docker containers from public and private Docker registries, including Docker Hub and NVIDIA GPU Cloud registry.

IBM Guardium Multi-Cloud Data Protection (BYOL)

IBM Guardium Multi-Cloud Data Protection (BYOL): IBM Guardium Multi-Cloud Data Protection helps protect sensitive data and support compliance efforts.

Joomla on CentOS 7.3

Joomla on CentOS 7.3: Joomla is a free and open-source content management system for publishing web content. It is built on a model-view-controller web application framework that can be used independently of the CMS.

Jruby on centos

Jruby on centos: JRuby is integrated with Java to allow both to script any Java class and to embed the interpreter into any Java application. JRuby provides a complete set of core built-in classes and syntax for the Ruby language, as well as most of the standard Ruby libraries.

Linux-Windows File System to Alation

Linux/Windows File System to Alation: Information Asset has developed a solution that imports files from Linux/Windows file systems into Alation. The solution can import JSON, CSV, XML, Avro, and Parquet file types into Alation Data Catalog.

NETSCOUT Application Performance Management, Azure

NETSCOUT Application Performance Management, Azure: NETSCOUT Application Performance Management for Azure is ideal for enterprises running application workloads that require compute, network, and storage in hybrid cloud environments.

Pantheon Core

Pantheon Core: Pantheon is an open-source Ethereum client written in Java under the Apache 2.0 license. Pantheon includes a command-line interface and JSON-RPC API for running, maintaining, debugging, and monitoring node operations in an Ethereum network.

Report Server on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

Report Server on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS: A report server is a stateless server that uses the SQL Server Database Engine to store metadata and object definitions. Report Server comes with a flexible authentication mechanism that can be extended via Report Server's infrastructure.

Rewards API

Rewards API: This rewards framework by BCS Technology can be used to implement customer loyalty programs. Users earn reputational tokens by carrying out transactions initiated through the rewards API.

SEOPanel on CentOS 7.3

SEOPanel on CentOS 7.3: SEO Panel is a complete open-source control panel for managing search engine optimization of your websites.

StratusCore Virtual Studio

StratusCore™ Virtual Studio™: StratusCore Virtual Studio lets visual effects artists, animators, and editors run critical, industry-standard applications virtually. Use top animation/VFX apps in a secure collaboration workspace starting with this free three-hour trial.

Unifi Data Platform

Unifi Data Platform: Unifi Data Platform breaks down the barriers of operational data silos and democratizes information across the enterprise. At the heart of the platform is a suite of self-service data discovery and preparation tools to empower business users.

Votiro Disarmer

Votiro Disarmer: Votiro Disarmer ensures all files entering your organization are safe to use. Votiro is an award-winning cybersecurity company with a mission to secure organizations throughout their digital transformation journey.

wildfly on centos

wildfly on centos: WildFly, formerly known as JBoss AS, is an application server authored by JBoss, now developed by Red Hat. WildFly is free and open-source software written in Java.

Workspot Workstation Cloud- GPU - VDI on Azure

Workspot Workstation Cloud: GPU / VDI on Azure: This turnkey cloud service from Workspot delivers high-performance GPU cloud workstations to any device.

ZeroReveal Compute Fabric

ZeroReveal™ Compute Fabric: Providing the foundation for a suite of ZeroReveal solutions, Enveil’s ZeroReveal Compute Fabric is a two-party platform consisting of the client application, which lives within the enterprise, and the server application, deployed where the data resides.


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Visual Studio 2017 version 15.9 now available

Programmierung vom 20.11.2018 um 01:10 Uhr | Quelle blogs.msdn.microsoft.com

Today, we are releasing Visual Studio 2017 version 15.9. The easiest way to update is directly from within Visual Studio 2017 by selecting Help>Check for Updates or select “Update” from the Visual Studio Installer. You can also download from the Visual Studio website to get the latest release of Visual Studio. If you prefer to try these updates without installing, you can create a Visual Studio image on Azure. You can find the complete list of all the changes in the release notes and view the issues you submitted that are fixed on Developer Community.

Let’s look at a couple of the standout scenarios in this update that you can now try.

Step Back for C++

Step back debugging is a type of historical debugging. Visual Studio works with the runtime and operating system to take snapshots of a running application’s stack, enabling you to hit a breakpoint and then to step backwards and forwards, with full access to the call stack, variables, and watch windows. We first talked about this feature back in October for C# in this blog post and now we’re adding it for C++.

With IntelliTrace events and snapshots enabled in Tools>Options>IntelliTrace, every step (in, out, over) you take has a corresponding “step backwards” command to get back to the state of the app at a previous step. Step Back saves you from having to restart your debug session just to check what state your app was in a few lines above. It also makes it easy to compare the state of your application at two different points. Better yet, the diagnostic tools window contains a list of all the states that you can jump to – just double click on your desired event in the diagnostic tools window.

To use the C++ step back feature, you’ll need the Enterprise edition of Visual Studio and the Windows 10 Anniversary Update (1607) or later.

Have a look at the gif below to see this feature in action, and remember that you can read more about how it works on the Visual C++ Team Blog.

Demonstration of C++ step backward and step over feature for Visual Studio 2017 Enterprise.

.NET Core tooling updates

The way Visual Studio exposes the .NET Core SDKs has been a bit confusing in the past. In version 15.9, we made a change to how .NET Core tools will use the .NET Core SDK. For stable releases of Visual Studio, the latest stable release of an SDK will be used by default. Before, the tools would use whatever latest version was on your machine, regardless of whether it is stable. This change will make use of .NET Core within Visual Studio more predictable. Read more on the .NET Blog.

Visual Studio installation configuration

Configuring Visual Studio setup and replicating that setup configuration on many computers has been too complex. In version 15.9 (with any product: Community, Professional, or Enterprise), we made it easy to save a Visual Studio installation configuration and use it to populate another. In the Visual Studio Installer, export the workload and component selection to a .vsconfig file. You can use this file to copy your installation configuration across multiple machines or share with others on your team. If you are importing to an existing installation, it will add new workloads and components, and will not replace the existing ones.

Visual Studio Enterprise 2017 import configuration on install.

Tools for Universal Windows Platform Developers

We have made a lot of improvements for developers building Universal Windows Platform applications. The key ones are: support for the Windows 10 October 2018 Update (build 17763) SDK, the ability to build .msix installation packages in Visual Studio using the normal packaging tools for UWPs, support for ARM64, and performance and reliability improvements (particularly improvements to F5 performance and XAML designer reliability).

Also, when using the XAML Designer for building UWP applications targeting the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update (Build 16299) or later, developers can now specify control display options. You can choose to have the designer display all controls, including custom user controls, or have the designer-only display platform controls. Only displaying platform controls may improve the stability of the designer and will render fallback controls represented by a yellow border.

XAML Designer control display options.

Support for SharePoint 2019

With SharePoint 2019 now generally available, we added templates for it. These templates allow you to create new projects that are empty, that contain a visual web part, or that are based on an existing SharePoint 2019 solution package. You can also migrate existing SharePoint projects from either SharePoint 2013 or SharePoint 2016 to SharePoint 2019. To do so, you can just open an existing SharePoint 2013 or SharePoint 2016 project in Visual Studio 2017 version 15.9 and you will see a dialog that gives you the option to upgrade the project type.

Please note that SharePoint 2019 support is only available in Visual Studio 2017 version 15.9. To upgrade your tooling, we recommend that you install the Office workload when upgrading to the latest version of Visual Studio.

Stay Connected

A final note: version 15.9 is the final minor update to Visual Studio 2017. We’ll still ship a few service updates (e.g. 15.9.1), and 15.9.x will become the Visual Studio 2017 servicing baseline and will be the supported version of Visual Studio 2017 starting January 14, 2020. You can read more from our blog post, Visual Studio 2017 and Visual Studio for Mac Support Updates.

As always, we  love to hear about your experiences with Visual Studio. Please install Visual Studio 2017 version 15.9 and let us know any issues you have via the Report a Problem tool in Visual Studio. You can also track your issues in Visual Studio Developer Community, as well as suggest a feature, ask questions, and find answers. Please engage with us and other Visual Studio developers through our Gitter community (requires GitHub account) or get free installation help through Live Chat Support.

John Montgomery, Director of Program Management for Visual Studio
@JohnMont

John is responsible for product design and customer success for all of Visual Studio, C++, C#, VB, JavaScript, and .NET. John has been at Microsoft for 17 years, working in developer technologies the whole time.


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Medienäquivalenzstudie zeigt: Bewegtbildwerbung wirkt

Programmierung vom 20.11.2018 um 01:00 Uhr | Quelle thinkwithgoogle.com
Mit der "Medienäquivalenzstudie: Video" wurde die erste Studie ihrer Art realisiert, die einen Einblick darin gibt, wie Bewegtbildwerbung abhängig vom Medium, der Platzierung und der Kontakthäufigkeit wirkt. Zudem zeigt sie, wie sich die Wirkung verändert, wenn die Bewegtbildformate kombiniert werden. Dies ermöglicht Werbetreibenden einen umfassenden qualitativen Wirkungsvergleich für die verschiedenen Kanäle.
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Die Renault Gruppe überzeugt Nutzer mit individualisierten Anzeigen

Programmierung vom 20.11.2018 um 01:00 Uhr | Quelle thinkwithgoogle.com
Die Renault Gruppe erreicht mit einer zentralen Implementierung von Creative-Assets für verschiedene Märkte die Cost-per-Lead-Ziele und steigert die Interaktionen.
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Die Aufmerksamkeit der Verbraucher zu wecken, ist schwer. "How-to"-Inhalte können helfen

Programmierung vom 20.11.2018 um 01:00 Uhr | Quelle thinkwithgoogle.com
Die YouTuber hinter dem beliebten Kanal "MyFroggyStuff" haben drei Tipps dazu, wie Sie mit Videoanleitungen auf sich aufmerksam machen und das Interesse der Zuschauer gewinnen.
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Vom Storytelling zum Storybuilding

Programmierung vom 20.11.2018 um 01:00 Uhr | Quelle thinkwithgoogle.com
Geschichten müssen heute nicht nur erzählt, sondern auch gelebt werden. Viele Unternehmen nutzen bereits das sogenannte Storytelling. Jetzt kommt eine weitere Dimension hinzu: das Storybuilding. John Osborn, CEO bei OMD, hat drei Tipps für einen erfolgreichen Einstieg.
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Drei Unternehmen, die ihrem Marketing mit einer daten- und technologiegestützten Strategie neuen Schub verleihen

Programmierung vom 20.11.2018 um 01:00 Uhr | Quelle thinkwithgoogle.com
In der Branche ist es längst kein Geheimnis mehr, dass man mit einer auf Daten und Technologie basierenden Marketingstrategie geschäftlich voll durchstarten kann. Wie aber können Werbetreibende die Besonderheiten ihrer Produkte, Marken und Kampagnen herausstellen, wenn alle Zugang zu denselben Tools und Innovationen haben?
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Gut vorbereitet auf das Weihnachtsgeschäft

Programmierung vom 20.11.2018 um 01:00 Uhr | Quelle thinkwithgoogle.com
Wenn Sie in die Weihnachtssaison gehen, sollten Sie eine Vorstellung davon haben, wann die Nachfrage voraussichtlich zu- oder abnimmt. Sonst reicht Ihr Budget unter Umständen nicht aus. Mit einer soliden Prognose sind Sie gut auf diese umsatzstarke Zeit des Jahres vorbereitet. Das Erstellen einer Prognose hat einen großen Vorteil: Es zwingt uns zu einer kundenorientierten Planung. Wir möchten ja die Nachfrage vorhersehen, also wissen, was Shopper zu welchem Zeitpunkt wollen. Je mehr wir den Kunden in den Mittelpunkt unseres Handelns stellen, desto effektiver sind wir als Werbetreibende und umso relevanter sind wir für den Nutzer.
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Björn Tantau: Wie Sie Ihre Website für mobile Höchstleistungen optimieren

Programmierung vom 20.11.2018 um 01:00 Uhr | Quelle thinkwithgoogle.com
“Mobil” oder “schnell” allein reicht nicht. Wenn Sie mit Ihrem Content wirklich erfolgreich sein wollen, dann spielen Usability und User Experience schon jetzt und nicht erst in der Zukunft eine sehr wichtige Rolle.
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Ein rentables Weihnachtsgeschäft dank Omni-Channel-Strategie

Programmierung vom 20.11.2018 um 01:00 Uhr | Quelle thinkwithgoogle.com
Weihnachten – bald ist es wieder soweit. Einzelhändler müssen sich jetzt sputen, denn dies ist die beste Zeit, um die Auswirkung ihres Onlinemarketings im Ganzen zu analysieren und eine geeignete Omni-Channel-Strategie zu entwickeln.
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