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Cognitive Services in Containers

Programmierung vom 19.11.2018 um 21:41 Uhr | Quelle blog.revolutionanalytics.com

I've posted several examples here of using Azure Cognitive Services for data science applications. You can upload an an image or video to the service and extract information about faces and emotions, generate a caption describing a scene from a provided photo, or speak written text in a natural voice. (If you haven't tried the Cognitive Services tools yet, you can try them out using the instructions in this notebook using only a browser.)

But what if you can't upload an image or text to the cloud? Sending data outside your network might be subject to regulatory or privacy policies. And if you could analyze the images or text locally, your application could benefit from reduced latency and bandwidth. 

Now, several of the Azure Cognitive Services APIs are available as Docker containers: you can download a container that provides the exact same APIs as the cloud-based services, and run it on a local Linux-based server or edge device. Images and text are processed directly in the container and never sent to the cloud. A connection to Azure is required only for billing, which is at the same rate as the cloud-based services (including a free tier).

The services now available as containers are:

You can learn more about Cognitive Services in the video below. (The information about the new container support starts at 11:20.)

You can also find detailed information about the Cognitive Services in containers in the blog post linked below.

Microsoft Azure blog: Getting started with Azure Cognitive Services in containers


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You're Not as Smart as You Think You Are

Programmierung vom 19.11.2018 um 20:52 Uhr | Quelle youtube.com

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Updated version of Windows 10 SDK now available with Visual Studio 15.9.1

Programmierung vom 19.11.2018 um 19:01 Uhr | Quelle blogs.windows.com

At Build 2018, I had the privilege of sharing with you some of the advancements for Microsoft 365 that centered on multi-sense and multi-device experiences. Today, developers can get the latest Windows 10 SDK and start using some of these amazing platform capabilities.

What’s in this update:

  • Windows UI Library (WinUI) allows you take advantage of the latest Fluent controls and styles for Windows 10 apps without having to wait for all your customers to update to the latest OS version. The WinUI nuget package is backward-compatible, down to Windows 10 version 1607 (Anniversary Update) and includes the same powerful, supported controls that Windows uses in its apps and experiences.
  • UWP XAML hosting API (Preview) allows ‘islands’ of UWP XAML UI elements to be hosted in applications built using non-UWP technologies such as Windows Forms, WPF, or C/C++ Win32, eliminating the need to re-write or re-package your application for UWP. We’ve created a set of WPF and WinForms wrappers for common UI elements that developers can use to save time.
  • Adaptive Cards 1.1 boosts feature additions such as Media Element and Action Icons and building cards easier with the new visual designer. Adaptive Cards is available in Outlook as Actionable Messages, in Cortana with Skills, and Teams through Azure Bot Service.
  • Graph Notifications (Preview) offers an enterprise-compliant, people-centric, and cross-platform notifications platform using Microsoft Graph. The tech preview supports iOS, Android, Windows, and the Graph Explorer.
  • Project Ink Analysis allows you to write applications that allow users to draw and express themselves and offers the capabilities to understand/recognize and make the ink more productive. This is the same technology we use to power Office today.
  • Hyper-V allows Android developers on Windows to enjoy a fast Android emulator running the latest Android APIs, all on Hyper-V. The minimum requirements to run this are Windows 10 version 1803 on an x86 based machine and Visual Studio v15.8 for IDE support.
  • It’s easier to start using the new Windows Machine Learning API, as it’s the same for both Win32 and UWP applications. New capabilities include: support for ONNX v1.2.2 models, converting FP32 datatypes in ONNX models to use FP16, support for Windows Server 2019, and improved evaluation times on the CPU and GPU.

Tune into Microsoft Connect () 2018 on December 4th to learn about the latest updates and advancements for Azure, Visual Studios, and Windows.

Kevin

The post Updated version of Windows 10 SDK now available with Visual Studio 15.9.1 appeared first on Windows Developer Blog.


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Updated version of Windows 10 SDK now available with Visual Studio 15.9.1

Programmierung vom 19.11.2018 um 19:01 Uhr | Quelle blogs.windows.com

At Build 2018, I had the privilege of sharing with you some of the advancements for Microsoft 365 that centered on multi-sense and multi-device experiences. Today, developers can get the latest Windows 10 SDK and start using some of these amazing platform capabilities.

What’s in this update:

  • Windows UI Library (WinUI) allows you take advantage of the latest Fluent controls and styles for Windows 10 apps without having to wait for all your customers to update to the latest OS version. The WinUI nuget package is backward-compatible, down to Windows 10 version 1607 (Anniversary Update) and includes the same powerful, supported controls that Windows uses in its apps and experiences.
  • UWP XAML hosting API (Preview) allows ‘islands’ of UWP XAML UI elements to be hosted in applications built using non-UWP technologies such as Windows Forms, WPF, or C/C++ Win32, eliminating the need to re-write or re-package your application for UWP. We’ve created a set of WPF and WinForms wrappers for common UI elements that developers can use to save time.
  • Adaptive Cards 1.1 boosts feature additions such as Media Element and Action Icons and building cards easier with the new visual designer. Adaptive Cards is available in Outlook as Actionable Messages, in Cortana with Skills, and Teams through Azure Bot Service.
  • Graph Notifications (Preview) offers an enterprise-compliant, people-centric, and cross-platform notifications platform using Microsoft Graph. The tech preview supports iOS, Android, Windows, and the Graph Explorer.
  • Project Ink Analysis allows you to write applications that allow users to draw and express themselves and offers the capabilities to understand/recognize and make the ink more productive. This is the same technology we use to power Office today.
  • Hyper-V allows Android developers on Windows to enjoy a fast Android emulator running the latest Android APIs, all on Hyper-V. The minimum requirements to run this are Windows 10 version 1803 on an x86 based machine and Visual Studio v15.8 for IDE support.
  • It’s easier to start using the new Windows Machine Learning API, as it’s the same for both Win32 and UWP applications. New capabilities include: support for ONNX v1.2.2 models, converting FP32 datatypes in ONNX models to use FP16, support for Windows Server 2019, and improved evaluation times on the CPU and GPU.

Tune into Microsoft Connect () 2018 on December 4th to learn about the latest updates and advancements for Azure, Visual Studios, and Windows.

Kevin

The post Updated version of Windows 10 SDK now available with Visual Studio 15.9.1 appeared first on Windows Developer Blog.


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Applied Best Practices in C++

Programmierung vom 19.11.2018 um 18:30 Uhr | Quelle youtube.com

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Brooks is running with Microsoft 365 to win the innovation race

Programmierung vom 19.11.2018 um 18:00 Uhr | Quelle microsoft.com

 


Profile picture of Ron Markezich.Brooks Running Company has a saying, “A run can flat out change a day, a life, the world,” and with an estimated 135 million runners around the globe (myself included), that’s a lot of good happening for a lot of people, in a lot of places. Brooks, a member of the Berkshire Hathaway group of companies, promotes the benefits of a heathy lifestyle through its groundbreaking biomechanical research, engineering running shoes and gear for professional athletes and consumers alike. As the company evolves its cloud-first IT strategy, we’re thrilled that Brooks chose Microsoft 365 to build a modern workplace with integrated tools that eliminate technical barriers to product innovation.

This is how Mark McKelvey, vice president of Information Technology at Brooks, describes the role that innovation has played in the company’s history—and the business value of continuing that tradition through a digital transformation of its own:

“Product innovation and superior service are Brooks’ competitive advantages. We use Microsoft 365 to empower employees and foster the creative collaboration required to generate new ideas that benefit runners. With frictionless access to the tools and information our teams need to be productive, employees can focus on what Brooks does best: bringing our Run Happy spirit and best-in-class gear to runners around the world.”

A recent example of Brooks’ innovation is the company’s gait analysis app, called Run Signature, that looks at a runner’s unique biomechanics and helps find the best running shoe for them. The app is built on the Microsoft Azure cloud platform, which also supports a new, highly successful B2B platform that Brooks recently debuted for its retailers. As Brooks expands its online platforms, we’re excited to see how Microsoft continues to be a great fit for the company’s cloud-first strategies.

The post Brooks is running with Microsoft 365 to win the innovation race appeared first on Microsoft 365 Blog.


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Neuerungen in Version Visual Studio 2017 v15.9

Programmierung vom 19.11.2018 um 13:01 Uhr | Quelle microsoft.com
Visual Studio ist in Version 2017 v15.9 erschienen. Neue Entwicklerwerkzeuge erlauben ab sofort die Kompilierung von nativen ARM64-Apps. Zu den wichtigsten Features der neuen Version gehören: Sie können nun eine Installationskonfigurationsdatei importieren und exportieren, die angibt, welche Workloads und Komponenten mit einer Instanz von Visual Studio installiert werden sollen. Das Debuggen für NuGet-Pakete wurde mit...
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Meet the Microsoft Azure IoT on Serverless Hackathon winners

Programmierung vom 19.11.2018 um 13:00 Uhr | Quelle azure.microsoft.com

When we started running the Azure IoT on Serverless Hackathon, we knew we were about to see a lot of cool solutions coming out of it. What we couldn’t anticipate was the high level of creativity shown on them, not just on a technological level, but especially on the problems these solutions were designed to solve. When thinking about Internet of Things (IoT) solutions, we can think by default about reading information from sensors and some traditional data processing. But developers from all over the world went above and beyond and presented very helpful solutions that ranged from improving safety and security, to helping with global problems such as pollution or recycling.

Each of the more than 30 projects were creative solutions aiming to solve day-to-day problems. While all of them are great examples of how we can improve our lives through technology, we wanted to highlight the three winners and the popular choice awardee.

Please join us on congratulating the winners for building innovative and powerful projects that leverage the power of Microsoft Azure to help make the world a better place. Congratulations on a great job!

First place – Clean Water AI

Clean Water AI is an IoT device that classifies and detects dangerous bacteria and harmful particles in the water, aiming to help solve the problem of people affected by contaminated water. Starting with a data science virtual machine to train the Neural Network model powering the solution, the Clean Water AI team did the model training in Azure and then deployed it on the edge. They had all the inferencing done directly on the device itself to improve latency and real-time results.

After processing, the data resulted in an input sample, which was in the form of a picture taken by the device itself with the Neural Network model. Then, it is pushed to Azure IoT Hub and used to ingest this data into the cloud solution. Azure Functions are triggered every time a new data point is sent through IoT Hub, which then picks up this data, processes it, and pushes it out again into Azure SQL for storage. Next, Azure Maps picks up this stored data and displays it on the proper locations to warn nearby users about the water quality.

For more information, refer to the step-by-step building process.

Second place – bSmart Diabetes Management System

The bSmart Diabetes Management System was inspired by the author’s daughter after she was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes. This clever solution integrates data from both an insulin pump and a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) to predict the blood glucose level expected within the next two hours. Depending on the value of these predictions, the system will also send automated messages to the caregiver suggesting the proper treatment in real time.

How does it work?

bSmart Diabetes Management System

Data from both the insulin pump and the CGM are stored into MongoDB through an Android application. With a custom Python script pushing the data from the IoT device to the cloud solution using Azure IoT Hub, every read is triggering the execution of Azure Functions that pick up the data and store it on Azure SQL. Then, every 10 minutes, another Azure Function is reading the data stored on the database to predict the future blood glucose levels. If those levels aren’t in the proper range, another Function is triggered by routing this data through Azure Queue Storage, and this function sends a text message with the suggested action via Twilio.

You can try it out browsing the GitHub repo for this project.

Third place – Recycle.io

Using sensors, a camera, machine learning, and cloud technologies, Recycle.io detects and processes real time non-recyclable and non-organic waste violations to provide analytics to authorities. These violations occur when non-recyclable or non-organic items are thrown in recyclable or organic trash bins respectively, and this project introduces an innovative IoT system aimed at reducing the amount of resources used by waste collection agencies in the U.S.

Azure IoT Edge modules on the device attached to the bin detect when trash is thrown with the help of an ultrasonic ranger sensor, and the camera captures a picture of the bin contents. Still, on the device, a customized computer vision model analyzes the image and returns a list with the items found, which is compared with the contaminants list provided. This list can be updated by the administrator through a combination of Azure Service Bus and Azure Functions pushing it to the edge device.

If any contaminant is found on the bin, the picture is uploaded to blob storage and event details are pushed through IoT Hub, which triggers an Azure Function that processes the data and stores it on Azure SQL. The web application displays all the bin details in the UI, also using Azure Functions to retrieve the data from the database to be presented.

Learn more about the architecture and creation of this project in its GitHub repo.

Popular choice – Preventing Distracted Driving

Awarded by public voting as part of the competition, Preventing Distracted Driving is a solution designed to prevent people from using specific applications such as messaging applications or social networks while driving. This solution uses the phone GPS to determine if the user is moving in a vehicle, the back camera of the phone, and a capacitive sensor installed in the back of the phone to determine his/her position in the car. The driver’s position is determined through a machine learning model and the number of fingers placed on the phone.

The application takes pictures every 10 seconds and runs them by a TensorFlow model, still in the phone. If the accuracy is not enough or the system has taken more than 10 pictures, the application uses Azure IoT Hub to ingest these images into the cloud solution for processing. Each uploaded picture triggers an Azure Function that runs the second TensorFlow model in the cloud, triggering another function with the inferred results that are stored for visualization.

Browse the code for this cool project at its GitHub repo.

Next steps

Now that you have seen all that you can accomplish with a good idea and some great cloud services, you are now ready to start your own project, right? Here are some resources that might help you get started:


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Simplifying confidential computing: Azure IoT Edge security with enclaves – Public preview

Programmierung vom 19.11.2018 um 11:00 Uhr | Quelle azure.microsoft.com

Enabling Open Enclave SDK for the intelligent edge and simplifying the development of trusted applications across operating systems and hardware platforms.

Today we are excited to announce the cross-platform availability of the Open Enclave SDK for devices at the intelligent edge, as well as the preview of integration of Open Enclave and the Azure IoT Edge security manager. Together with our partners, we help organizations solve a very challenging security problem in the Internet of Things (IoT) – protecting code and data while in use at the edge. This includes securing compute workloads within the confines of Trusted Execution Environments (TEE) or simply enclaves, a concept called Confidential Computing.  We offer a platform for developing applications that execute in enclaves, also known as trusted applications (TA), in a way that simplifies TA development for all audiences from hardcore hardware security experts to edge and cloud software applications developers.

With today’s announcement, Azure IoT Edge application developers can write TAs that root trust in any secure silicon TEE built on such enclaving technologies like ARM TrustZone®, Intel SGX, and embedded Secure Elements using Windows or Linux operating systems. This broad applicability across different enclave technologies and integration with IoT Edge greatly simplifies the work developers must do to protect data and devices at the edge. With accessibility by all security expertise as topmost goal, this integration is laden with features to truly simplify and shorten the journey from idea to at-scale production deployment of secure intelligent edge applications.

Allow me to provide some context.

The need for security at the intelligent edge

The intelligent edge extends cloud intelligence and analytics to edge devices. Azure IoT Edge is a fully managed service that delivers cloud intelligence locally by deploying Azure AI, Azure services, and custom logic directly on edge devices, such as gateway class devices. IoT Edge lets organizations bring AI and cloud analytics to the edge in cases where poor/no connectivity, high latency, or high costs would have prevented connection to the cloud.

Security is crucial for trust and integrity at the edge because by their very nature, IoT devices may not always be in trusted custody. More so, intelligent edge devices are much “smarter” than most IoT devices; in contrast to the common sensors and actuators class of IoT devices, they process highly sensitive workloads to generate equally sensitive results, thereby requiring strong protection for security goals like integrity, privacy, and confidentiality. Prior to the intelligent edge and edge-class IoT devices, these sensitive workloads existed only within the safety of the cloud. As these organizations move these sensitive workloads to the intelligent edge, they face increased risk from threats like tampering and forgery because the devices are often easily physically accessible. To reduce that risk, we created Azure Sphere, a solution for building highly-secured microcontroller devices, to help organizations build trustworthy devices for edge applications.

We recognize, however, that that IoT devices derive from a wide variety of hardware to allow for optimal solutions to the problems IoT targets; not all edge devices can be built on a microcontroller, meaning organizations need a greater variety of devices than they can build with Azure Sphere. With that variety, unfortunately, comes an expanded threat surface. For security to be effective, the solution must be uniform across devices to enable safe operation at scale. The heterogeneous nature of hardware in edge devices at the edge, more than its cloud counterpart, calls for very strong diligence. Just like the cloud, the intelligent edge requires a strong stance on security that addresses all threats, including emerging threats specific to operating at the edge.

With security in forethought, we designed Azure IoT Edge with a solid foundation of security principles for the intelligent edge.  One year ago together with partners, we proved these principles thereby paving the way for all the possibilities towards achieving the highest security at the edge, but we did not stop there. We needed to scale this model by tapping into the domain expertise of the manufacturers who produce hardware root of trust modules. We also needed to isolate the IoT and cloud application developer from the complexity and nuances of working with secure silicon hardware. We achieved both goals with Azure IoT Edge security manager, a well-bounded trusted computing base whose sole mission is to protect the Azure IoT Edge device and its components by rooting the identity and sensitive workloads of the device in secure silicon also commonly known as a hardware security module (HSM). Azure IoT Edge security manager spurred the availability of secured edge devices from various Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) as standard commercial off-the-shelf offerings. Although we’re happy with more availability of secured edge devices for our customers, we’re not done with our plan to increase the security of the intelligent edge.

Our next mission for securing the intelligent edge is to simplify access to security best practices for experts and non-experts for all security challenges, especially the big challenges. Until now, the ability to secure data at rest and data in transit has remained the sole province of security experts; on the other hand, it is generally considered a “solved problem,” meaning that non-experts can take advantage of the work experts have done and technology vendors have adopted. Emerging with the intelligent edge, however, is the need to protect data in use at the edge, and this is a tall challenge even to the experts. Confidential computing at the edge is today’s immediate, big security challenge. The solution is never to lower the bar for security, but to rise above the challenge and empower every application developer, security experts and non-experts alike, with the right tools.

Two months ago, Microsoft launched the Open Enclave SDK, an open source consistent API surface across enclave technologies and platforms from cloud to edge. This means that developers can use the same APIs across multiple enclaves, greatly reducing the complexity of following best practices and encouraging organizations to integrate applications with enclaves. Available with this version was the ability to write enclave applications for cloud workloads targeting TEE technology based on Intel Software Extension Guard (SGX) hardware technology and the Linux Operating System.

Azure cloud computing services

Figure 1. Architecture of cloud-edge consistent confidential computing framework showing where the Open Enclave API and abstraction fits in intelligent edge scenarios based on Azure IoT Edge. Open Enclave API offers the interface between TEE and a non-TEE environment commonly known as the Rich Execution Environment (REE). Underneath the Open Enclave API, adopters have the option of choosing Open Enclave SDK or an equivalent implementation from a third party offering.

Features

Secure silicon hardware abstraction

Open Enclave abstracts the developer experience away from the complexity and nuances of secure hardware, meaning that its easier for developers to learn to integrate their apps with secure hardware and easier for developers to write consistently secure software across devices.

Tooled for familiarity

Support for Visual Studio for Windows and GDB for Linux is available now so that developers can engage in already familiar development environments of choice.

Trusted Execution Environment (TEE) emulation for richer Trusted Application (TA) development

Until now, development of enclave applications or TA, especially for edge scenarios, has been the sole domain of a few experts with extensive experience in the specific TEE hardware offering. Development required access to the hardware, and debugging was extremely challenging given enclaving is about protecting data. We’re changing that by providing TEE emulation so that any developer, not just TEE hardware experts, can develop and debug trusted applications using familiar tools and with no need for the hardware. Developers can develop once and compile for multiple TEE hardware technology targets.

Designed for cloud-edge consistent confidential computing

Confidential compute resources are different for cloud and edge but the development experience for confidential compute workloads targeting the cloud and edge need not be different. In a single development environment, developers can create trusted applications for deployment in cloud enclaves like Azure Confidential Computing and in TEE enabled IoT Edge devices. Developers can create holistic security for applications where code and data are protected at rest, in flight, and while in use at the edge and in the cloud. In the very near future, they’ll be able to leverage Azure Device Provisioning Service (DPS), an at scale global provision service to provision and manage the lifecycle of confidential compute workloads and trusted applications consistently across cloud and edge.

Rich and diverse partner ecosystem

We strongly believe security in IoT is a community play. IoT deployments require trust from the device manufacturer to the solution integrator and solution backend—for this reason we’re aligning with industry leaders in various roles to enable truly end-to-end security for IoT devices, connections, and cloud.

Technology Silicon provider Original design manufacturer (ODM) Original equipment manufacturer (OEM) Independent software vendor (ISV) Mass production & distribution
ARM logo image image image image image
Intel logo image image

Hewlett_Packard_Enterprise_logo

   wolf ssl-logo-shadow-1  

Application possibilities with confidential computing using Azure IoT Edge

Azure IoT Edge with Open Enclave uses confidential computing to provide solutions to security challenges previously very difficult to surmount. It really comes down to protecting the executable delivering the business function.

image

TrustBox – One optimal path from evaluation to mass production

As organizations learn about the intelligent edge and begin projects, they often find themselves slowed down by unforeseen security and compliance challenges. In response, we are working with partners to shorten the journey from evaluation of a project to production. Until now, a typical experience entails developers evaluating and experimenting using many commercially available prototyping boards, such as Arduino-based boards or Raspberry Pis. Unfortunately, when the developers move to production, they find they have to switch boards to a solution that can meet the required security and compliance standards for their industry. Rather than switching boards later, developers should begin evaluation with boards that can later serve pilot and production needs while meeting compliance goals.

TrustBox is one option to address this need for prototype to production boards, providing a high-grade secure router and IoT gateway based around NXP Layerscape LS1012A networking processor that integrates hardware root of trust, cryptographic accelerators and network acceleration. Following deep security engineering and careful selection of components, TrustBox is certifiable to the highest levels of industry and security standards. TrustBox is the winner of the award for 2019 CES Best of Innovations: Cybersecurity and Personal Privacy.

TrustBox

Figure 2: TrustBox, a high-grade secure router & IoT gateway based on NXP Layerscape LS1012A, a member of NXP’s Layerscape family of hardware root of trust and cryptographic accelerators. TrustBox is available as is or customizable through Scalys for evaluation, pilot and production runs.

Availability of evaluation boards is just one of many steps to mass production which can be daunting where there is need to customize the boards. To this end we allied with NXP, Scalys, and Arrow Electronics, to provide an example of a complete supply chain from integrated circuit to final distribution.

The supply chain for TrustBox

Figure 3: The supply chain for TrustBox that is available now for all enclave secured device needs to include sourcing for evaluation and pilot runs, hardware customizations, and mass production. This is only one of many possibilities.

Scalys TrustBox is expected to ship in volume from February 2019, and you can pre-order from Scalys now. You can also start evaluating now with Grapeboard, the commercial grade electrical equivalent of TrustBox.

What’s next

One goal of the preview of Open Enclave integration with IoT Edge is to jumpstart hardware centric development by Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM) towards availing TEE capable devices. Within the next few months we anticipate availability of TEE capable Azure IoT Edge certified devices that will deliver the same platform agnostic developer and deployment experience available today. At that time developers can also expect refined TA lifecycle management capabilities. Until then, the developer preview will include well documented platform specific setup scripts.

Enclaving technology for the edge has been around for many years in niche industries like banking and governments. Until now, access to the technology has been limited to few people with deep expertise on specific TEE hardware and enclaving technology. Today, in collaboration with partners, we’re offering the platform to simplify development of trusted applications at the edge, thereby extending this privilege to edge and cloud application developers of all abilities. Open sourcing of the various components of the newly expanded repository commences today.


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Simplifying confidential computing: Azure IoT Edge security with enclaves – Public preview

Programmierung vom 19.11.2018 um 11:00 Uhr | Quelle azure.microsoft.com

Enabling Open Enclave SDK for the intelligent edge and simplifying the development of trusted applications across operating systems and hardware platforms.

Today we are excited to announce the cross-platform availability of the Open Enclave SDK for devices at the intelligent edge, as well as the preview of integration of Open Enclave and the Azure IoT Edge security manager. Together with our partners, we help organizations solve a very challenging security problem in the Internet of Things (IoT) – protecting code and data while in use at the edge. This includes securing compute workloads within the confines of Trusted Execution Environments (TEE) or simply enclaves, a concept called Confidential Computing.  We offer a platform for developing applications that execute in enclaves, also known as trusted applications (TA), in a way that simplifies TA development for all audiences from hardcore hardware security experts to edge and cloud software applications developers.

With today’s announcement, Azure IoT Edge application developers can write TAs that root trust in any secure silicon TEE built on such enclaving technologies like ARM TrustZone®, Intel SGX, and embedded Secure Elements using Windows or Linux operating systems. This broad applicability across different enclave technologies and integration with IoT Edge greatly simplifies the work developers must do to protect data and devices at the edge. With accessibility by all security expertise as topmost goal, this integration is laden with features to truly simplify and shorten the journey from idea to at-scale production deployment of secure intelligent edge applications.

Allow me to provide some context.

The need for security at the intelligent edge

The intelligent edge extends cloud intelligence and analytics to edge devices. Azure IoT Edge is a fully managed service that delivers cloud intelligence locally by deploying Azure AI, Azure services, and custom logic directly on edge devices, such as gateway class devices. IoT Edge lets organizations bring AI and cloud analytics to the edge in cases where poor/no connectivity, high latency, or high costs would have prevented connection to the cloud.

Security is crucial for trust and integrity at the edge because by their very nature, IoT devices may not always be in trusted custody. More so, intelligent edge devices are much “smarter” than most IoT devices; in contrast to the common sensors and actuators class of IoT devices, they process highly sensitive workloads to generate equally sensitive results, thereby requiring strong protection for security goals like integrity, privacy, and confidentiality. Prior to the intelligent edge and edge-class IoT devices, these sensitive workloads existed only within the safety of the cloud. As these organizations move these sensitive workloads to the intelligent edge, they face increased risk from threats like tampering and forgery because the devices are often easily physically accessible. To reduce that risk, we created Azure Sphere, a solution for building highly-secured microcontroller devices, to help organizations build trustworthy devices for edge applications.

We recognize, however, that that IoT devices derive from a wide variety of hardware to allow for optimal solutions to the problems IoT targets; not all edge devices can be built on a microcontroller, meaning organizations need a greater variety of devices than they can build with Azure Sphere. With that variety, unfortunately, comes an expanded threat surface. For security to be effective, the solution must be uniform across devices to enable safe operation at scale. The heterogeneous nature of hardware in edge devices at the edge, more than its cloud counterpart, calls for very strong diligence. Just like the cloud, the intelligent edge requires a strong stance on security that addresses all threats, including emerging threats specific to operating at the edge.

With security in forethought, we designed Azure IoT Edge with a solid foundation of security principles for the intelligent edge.  One year ago together with partners, we proved these principles thereby paving the way for all the possibilities towards achieving the highest security at the edge, but we did not stop there. We needed to scale this model by tapping into the domain expertise of the manufacturers who produce hardware root of trust modules. We also needed to isolate the IoT and cloud application developer from the complexity and nuances of working with secure silicon hardware. We achieved both goals with Azure IoT Edge security manager, a well-bounded trusted computing base whose sole mission is to protect the Azure IoT Edge device and its components by rooting the identity and sensitive workloads of the device in secure silicon also commonly known as a hardware security module (HSM). Azure IoT Edge security manager spurred the availability of secured edge devices from various Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) as standard commercial off-the-shelf offerings. Although we’re happy with more availability of secured edge devices for our customers, we’re not done with our plan to increase the security of the intelligent edge.

Our next mission for securing the intelligent edge is to simplify access to security best practices for experts and non-experts for all security challenges, especially the big challenges. Until now, the ability to secure data at rest and data in transit has remained the sole province of security experts; on the other hand, it is generally considered a “solved problem,” meaning that non-experts can take advantage of the work experts have done and technology vendors have adopted. Emerging with the intelligent edge, however, is the need to protect data in use at the edge, and this is a tall challenge even to the experts. Confidential computing at the edge is today’s immediate, big security challenge. The solution is never to lower the bar for security, but to rise above the challenge and empower every application developer, security experts and non-experts alike, with the right tools.

Two months ago, Microsoft launched the Open Enclave SDK, an open source consistent API surface across enclave technologies and platforms from cloud to edge. This means that developers can use the same APIs across multiple enclaves, greatly reducing the complexity of following best practices and encouraging organizations to integrate applications with enclaves. Available with this version was the ability to write enclave applications for cloud workloads targeting TEE technology based on Intel Software Extension Guard (SGX) hardware technology and the Linux Operating System.

Azure cloud computing services

Figure 1. Architecture of cloud-edge consistent confidential computing framework showing where the Open Enclave API and abstraction fits in intelligent edge scenarios based on Azure IoT Edge. Open Enclave API offers the interface between TEE and a non-TEE environment commonly known as the Rich Execution Environment (REE). Underneath the Open Enclave API, adopters have the option of choosing Open Enclave SDK or an equivalent implementation from a third party offering.

Features

Secure silicon hardware abstraction

Open Enclave abstracts the developer experience away from the complexity and nuances of secure hardware, meaning that its easier for developers to learn to integrate their apps with secure hardware and easier for developers to write consistently secure software across devices.

Tooled for familiarity

Support for Visual Studio for Windows and GDB for Linux is available now so that developers can engage in already familiar development environments of choice.

Trusted Execution Environment (TEE) emulation for richer Trusted Application (TA) development

Until now, development of enclave applications or TA, especially for edge scenarios, has been the sole domain of a few experts with extensive experience in the specific TEE hardware offering. Development required access to the hardware, and debugging was extremely challenging given enclaving is about protecting data. We’re changing that by providing TEE emulation so that any developer, not just TEE hardware experts, can develop and debug trusted applications using familiar tools and with no need for the hardware. Developers can develop once and compile for multiple TEE hardware technology targets.

Designed for cloud-edge consistent confidential computing

Confidential compute resources are different for cloud and edge but the development experience for confidential compute workloads targeting the cloud and edge need not be different. In a single development environment, developers can create trusted applications for deployment in cloud enclaves like Azure Confidential Computing and in TEE enabled IoT Edge devices. Developers can create holistic security for applications where code and data are protected at rest, in flight, and while in use at the edge and in the cloud. In the very near future, they’ll be able to leverage Azure Device Provisioning Service (DPS), an at scale global provision service to provision and manage the lifecycle of confidential compute workloads and trusted applications consistently across cloud and edge.

Rich and diverse partner ecosystem

We strongly believe security in IoT is a community play. IoT deployments require trust from the device manufacturer to the solution integrator and solution backend—for this reason we’re aligning with industry leaders in various roles to enable truly end-to-end security for IoT devices, connections, and cloud.

Technology Silicon provider Original design manufacturer (ODM) Original equipment manufacturer (OEM) Independent software vendor (ISV) Mass production & distribution
ARM logo image image image image image
Intel logo image image

Hewlett_Packard_Enterprise_logo

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Application possibilities with confidential computing using Azure IoT Edge

Azure IoT Edge with Open Enclave uses confidential computing to provide solutions to security challenges previously very difficult to surmount. It really comes down to protecting the executable delivering the business function.

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TrustBox – One optimal path from evaluation to mass production

As organizations learn about the intelligent edge and begin projects, they often find themselves slowed down by unforeseen security and compliance challenges. In response, we are working with partners to shorten the journey from evaluation of a project to production. Until now, a typical experience entails developers evaluating and experimenting using many commercially available prototyping boards, such as Arduino-based boards or Raspberry Pis. Unfortunately, when the developers move to production, they find they have to switch boards to a solution that can meet the required security and compliance standards for their industry. Rather than switching boards later, developers should begin evaluation with boards that can later serve pilot and production needs while meeting compliance goals.

TrustBox is one option to address this need for prototype to production boards, providing a high-grade secure router and IoT gateway based around NXP Layerscape LS1012A networking processor that integrates hardware root of trust, cryptographic accelerators and network acceleration. Following deep security engineering and careful selection of components, TrustBox is certifiable to the highest levels of industry and security standards. TrustBox is the winner of the award for 2019 CES Best of Innovations: Cybersecurity and Personal Privacy.

TrustBox

Figure 2: TrustBox, a high-grade secure router & IoT gateway based on NXP Layerscape LS1012A, a member of NXP’s Layerscape family of hardware root of trust and cryptographic accelerators. TrustBox is available as is or customizable through Scalys for evaluation, pilot and production runs.

Availability of evaluation boards is just one of many steps to mass production which can be daunting where there is need to customize the boards. To this end we allied with NXP, Scalys, and Arrow Electronics, to provide an example of a complete supply chain from integrated circuit to final distribution.

The supply chain for TrustBox

Figure 3: The supply chain for TrustBox that is available now for all enclave secured device needs to include sourcing for evaluation and pilot runs, hardware customizations, and mass production. This is only one of many possibilities.

Scalys TrustBox is expected to ship in volume from February 2019, and you can pre-order from Scalys now. You can also start evaluating now with Grapeboard, the commercial grade electrical equivalent of TrustBox.

What’s next

One goal of the preview of Open Enclave integration with IoT Edge is to jumpstart hardware centric development by Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM) towards availing TEE capable devices. Within the next few months we anticipate availability of TEE capable Azure IoT Edge certified devices that will deliver the same platform agnostic developer and deployment experience available today. At that time developers can also expect refined TA lifecycle management capabilities. Until then, the developer preview will include well documented platform specific setup scripts.

Enclaving technology for the edge has been around for many years in niche industries like banking and governments. Until now, access to the technology has been limited to few people with deep expertise on specific TEE hardware and enclaving technology. Today, in collaboration with partners, we’re offering the platform to simplify development of trusted applications at the edge, thereby extending this privilege to edge and cloud application developers of all abilities. Open sourcing of the various components of the newly expanded repository commences today.


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Real-time event processing with Azure Database for PostgreSQL and Event Grid integration

Programmierung vom 19.11.2018 um 10:00 Uhr | Quelle azure.microsoft.com

Most modern applications are built using events whether it is reacting to changes coming from IoT devices, responding to a new listing in a marketplace solution, or initiating business processes from customer requests. PostgreSQL is a popular open source database with rich extensibility to meet the event-based notification and distributed design needs of the modern application. PostgreSQL’s Notify functionality allows for sending a notification event as change feed to the listener channel specified in the database. With serverless platforms in Azure such as, Azure Event Grid a fully managed serverless event routing service, Azure Functions a serverless compute engine, and Azure Logic Apps a serverless workflow orchestration engine, it is easy to perform event-based processing and workflows responding to the events in real-time.

Consider a marketplace e-commerce solution where buyers meet sellers. A typical marketplace solution is a collection of microservices providing a seamless buying and selling experience to the end users. The modern microservices design leverages purpose-built app platforms and data stores, which are optimized for scenarios while working in tandem to achieve a unified experience for end users. For example, graph store is better suited for recommendation engine, while a relational datastore like PostgreSQL is suited for relational inventory data and NoSQL document stores needs. This architectural pattern is also referred to as polyglot persistence derived from polyglot programming. One of the challenges with polyglot persistence is synchronization between data stores so that writes into one data store are synced with other data stores. The integration of Azure Database for PostgreSQL service with Azure Event Grid enables this synchronization with real-time event-based processing.

Marketplace E-Commerce Solution flow chart

In a marketplace solution, consider a scenario where a seller uploads or lists a new product to sell. It is an event which results in a new entry into the PostgreSQL inventory database and requires triggering of a caches refresh and re-indexing of search catalogs immediately to make it visible for new buyers and visitors looking for the product. In addition, if there are customers subscribed for the availability of that product type or category, a notification needs to be sent to them to alert them of the product availability as soon as the product listing is completed. Finally, the change feed needs to be sent to the data lake for real-time analytics and machine learning scoring so that it shows up in the recommendation engine. The workflow for this scenario in Azure platform with Azure Database for PostgreSQL and Event Grid is depicted below.

Workflow scenario in Azure platform with Azure Database for PostgreSQL and Event Grid

The notification from Azure Database for PostgreSQL service to Azure Event Grid simplifies the above requirement, making it easy to notify multiple subscribers of the topic when a new product is listed. The integration is enabled by leveraging Notify functionality which is available in Azure Database for PostgreSQL, and by defining a custom listener channel which publishes the changes to the Event Grid topic making it available to all the subscribers. The Event Grid topic for subscribers can be Azure functions, Azure Logic apps, and/or Webhooks in order to process the change feed and perform respective functions of triggering cache refresh, re-indexing of search catalog, or real-time scoring for recommendation engine.

Leveraging Notify for publishing to Event Grid flow chart

We have published detailed instructions and a sample app with listener code in our GitHub repository. You can leverage the instructions to implement event based triggers and build scale out architecture with Azure Database for PostgreSQL and Event Grid. This allows you to unlock new scenarios and capabilities on Microsoft Azure. We encourage the developer community to reuse it and raise issues or contribute back by sending a pull request.

Get started and create your PostgreSQL servers today! Learn more about Azure Database for PostgreSQL in the overview and supported extensions documentation.

Please continue to provide UserVoice feedback on the features and functionality that you want to see next. If you need any help or have questions, please check out the Azure Database for PostgreSQL documentation. Follow us on Twitter @AzureDBPostgreSQL for the latest news and announcements.

Acknowledgements

Special thanks to Qingging Yuan, Bassu Hiremath, Rachel Agyemang, Harini Gupta, Sunil Kamath, and Raja Ravipati for their contributions to this posting.


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Azure.Source – Volume 58

Programmierung vom 19.11.2018 um 09:30 Uhr | Quelle azure.microsoft.com

Now in preview

Update 18.11 for Azure Sphere in public preview

This is an update to the Azure Sphere Operating System, Azure Sphere Security Service, and Visual Studio development environment. This release includes substantial investments in our security infrastructure and our connectivity solutions, and it incorporates some of your feedback. Azure Sphere, which is in public preview, is a secured, high-level application platform with built-in communication and security features for internet-connected devices. It comprises an Azure Sphere microcontroller unit (MCU), tools and an SDK for developing applications, and the Azure Sphere Security Service, through which applications can securely connect to the cloud and web.

Photograph of an Azure Sphere device

Azure Kubernetes Service now in private preview in Azure China

Azure is the first cloud provider to provide a managed Kubernetes service within mainland China. As in the other regions where the service is available worldwide, AKS in China offers users a way to quickly and easily create a Kubernetes cluster on Azure infrastructure, then scale, upgrade, and monitor that cluster with a set of simple and intuitive tools. You must have an Azure China subscription to participate in the preview.

Public Preview of Multiplayer Servers

PlayFab Multiplayer Servers brings you the expertise and scalability of PlayFab and Azure to get multiplayer games up and running quickly with cloud compute while you focus on the game. Our re-engineered multiplayer server solution simplifies cloud resource management to enable dynamic, scale-based game servers on-demand. We operate the service and servers, so you don’t have to manage dedicated, on-premises server hardware. PlayFab Multiplayer Servers orchestrates Azure compute resources to reduce your cost and complexity of hosting dedicated game servers. All PlayFab Indie, Pro, and Enterprise tier customers can access the service and use a limited, free quota of Multiplayer Servers for product evaluation and testing.

Screenshot of updated PlayFab Multiplayer Servers tab

Protect Linux containers running in IaaS with Azure Security Center

Azure Security Center now provides you with several new capabilities to help you secure your containers, including: visibility to the containers hosted on IaaS Linux machines; security recommendations based on the CIS benchmark for Docker; and real time container threat detection. To start securing your containers, public cloud customers can take advantage of the public preview of this capability in the Standard tier of Security Center.

Bringing AI to the edge

Azure Cognitive Services containers are now in preview, making it possible to build intelligent applications that span the cloud and the edge. Azure Cognitive Services allow developers to easily add cognitive features—such as object detection, vision recognition, and language understanding—into their applications without having direct AI or data science skills or knowledge. By deploying Cognitive Services in containers, you can analyze information close to the physical world where the data resides, to deliver real-time insights and immersive experiences that are highly responsive and contextually aware. Cognitive Services containers enable you to build one application architecture that is optimized to take advantage of both robust cloud capabilities and edge locality.

Get started in minutes: Build your own enterprise grade virtual assistant

The Virtual Assistant solution accelerator is an open source bot solution accelerator for virtual assistants and simplifies the creation of branded virtual assistants, enabling developers to get started in minutes. The Bot Framework SDK and Tools version 4.1 is generally available, enabling developers to be more productive with bot development. The Virtual Assistant builds on the Enterprise Template capabilities which provide foundational capabilities for conversational experiences including base conversational intents in multiple languages, Dispatching, QnA and conversational insights. Also covered in this post, Microsoft signed an agreement to acquire XOXCO, a software product design studio most known for its conversational AI and bot development capabilities.

Diagram visualizing the capabilities of the Virtual Assistant solution accelerator

Also in preview

Get the latest updates: In preview

In development

Get the latest updates: in development

Now available

Introducing the Azure Blockchain Development Kit

The initial release of the Azure Blockchain Development Kit, which is built on Microsoft’s serverless technologies and seamlessly integrates blockchain with the best of Microsoft and third-party SaaS, is now available. This kit extends the capabilities of our blockchain developer templates and Azure Blockchain Workbench, which incorporates Azure services for key management, off-chain identity and data, monitoring, and messaging APIs into a reference architecture that can be used to rapidly build blockchain-based applications. Solutions are written using online visual workflow designers and Visual Studio Code, a free download that provides an integrated development environment on Windows, Mac, and Linux. This initial release prioritizes capabilities related to three key themes: connecting interfaces, integrating data and systems, and deploying smart contracts and blockchain networks. Be sure to check out the new whitepaper, DevOps for Blockchain Smart Contracts and the new Channel 9 show, Block Talk:

Genesis Episode: This is Block Talk | Block Talk

Marc Mercuri, Cale Teeter and Cody Born introduce Block Talk, a weekly show on blockchain and cloud from the Azure Blockchain engineering team.

MongoDB Atlas free tier is now available on Azure

You can now use the global cloud database MongoDB Atlas for free on Microsoft Azure. The newly available free tier on Azure is known as the M0, and grants users 512 MB of storage which is ideal for learning MongoDB, prototyping, and early development. The Atlas free tier will run the latest version of MongoDB, one of the most popular databases on the planet. Like larger MongoDB Atlas cluster types, M0 clusters can grant users optimal security with end-to-end encryption, high availability, and fully managed upgrades. M0 clusters also enable faster development by allowing teams to perform create, read, update, and delete (CRUD) operations against their data right from their browsers via the built-in Data Explorer.

Azure Toolkit for IntelliJ – Spark Interactive Console

The Spark Interactive Console in Azure Toolkit for IntelliJ is now available. This new component facilitates Spark job authoring, and enables you to run code interactively in a shell-like environment within IntelliJ. The Spark console includes Spark Local Console and Spark Livy Interactive Session, and has a built-in language service for Scala programming. The addition of the Spark console is an important step forward for the Azure Toolkit because of its expanding capabilities beyond batch job processing. This update also supports interactive querying across local and dev/test clusters.

Also generally available

Get the latest updates: Now available

News and updates

Deploy, develop, and troubleshoot faster with Azure Blockchain Workbench 1.5.0

This month's release of Azure Blockchain Workbench 1.5.0 focuses on two key themes, making Workbench easier to deploy and simplifying the process of developing and testing your end to end blockchain solutions. We streamlined the deployment template with default values and easier Azure Active Directory (AAD) integration. We also added guidance on how to use Application Insights to troubleshoot issues, added robust telemetry, and more targeted error messages to help you pinpoint issues faster.

Microsoft Azure is now certified to host sensitive health data in France

Recently at the Microsoft Experiences18 conference in Paris, we shared that Microsoft Azure, Microsoft Office 365, and Microsoft Dynamics have been granted a Health Data Hosting (HDS) certification. This makes Microsoft the first major cloud provider capable of meeting the strict standards of storing and processing health data for data centers located in France, and under the new certification process that began in June 2018. Azure France includes France Central region based in Paris, and France South region in Marseille. France Central now offers three availability zones for increased availability, resiliency, and business continuity.

Let AI help you be more productive with Microsoft Azure CLI

Azure Aladdin helps make using Azure easier. The first interface was a Microsoft docs extension that provided users content recommendations. The next interface to the Aladdin knowledge base is an experimental Azure Command-line interface (CLI) extension (az find) that provides insight and examples based on how other user have seen success using Microsoft Azure. Add the extension (az extension add -n find) and check it out.

Diagram showing sources of information for Azure Aladdin KB, including Azure Docs, Product Code, Azure CLI Usage, GitHub Issues, and ARM Usage

Microsoft and Intel donate Azure Hardware, AI Services to Advance Intelligent Edge Research at Carnegie Mellon University

Microsoft is donating cloud hardware and services to Carnegie Mellon University’s Living Edge Laboratory. Carnegie Mellon University is recognized as one of the leading global research institutions. Earlier this year, the university announced a $27.5 million semiconductor research initiative to connect edge devices to the cloud. The Living Edge Laboratory is a testbed for exploring applications that generate large data volumes and require intense processing with near-instantaneous response times. Microsoft will donate an Azure Data Box Edge, Azure Stack partnering with Intel, and Azure credits to do advanced machine learning and AI at the edge.

Azure shows

Episode 255 - Chatbots | The Azure Podcast

All the co-hosts are in the house for a change, having a fascinating discussion with Péter Bozsó, an Azure AppDev Consultant from Microsoft, Hungary. He gives us all the info on how to start writing Chatbots in Azure including tips and tricks, what not to do, etc.

Whats new with Azure VM Disk Images | Tuesdays with Corey

Corey Sanders, Corporate VP - Microsoft Azure Compute team sat down with Kay Singh, Senior PM on the Azure compute team to talk about Disk Images! Introducing Shared Image Gallery with image versioning, End of Life metadata and more.

Faster, more accessible edge HPC with Avere vFXT for Azure | Azure Friday

Scott Jeschonek joins Azure Friday and Lara Rubbelke to introduce Avere vFXT for Azure, a new Azure Marketplace product with big possibilities for high-performacne computing (HPC) environments. Avere vFXT for Azure solves the core issue of running performance-demanding workloads that require NFS backends in the cloud, leveraging either on-premises storage or Azure Blob, without the expected latency or storage bottlenecks inherent to read-heavy processing.

Azure HDInsight: New Spark UI extensions for better job performance analysis | Azure Friday

Maxim Lukiyanov and Scott Hanselman discuss intricate ways in which Apache Spark jobs can fail in production and how new diagnostics tools, now available in Azure HDInsight, visualize these problems in a new intuitive way and help discover and understand them from the first glance.

Role Based Access Control in Azure IoT solution accelerators | Internet of Things Show

Come learn about the importance of restricting access to your IoT solution and how to implement role based access control.

How to use Time Series Insights in Azure IoT solution accelerators | Internet of Things Show

Come uncover hidden insights about your data with Azure IoT solution accelerators and our newly released integration with Azure Time Series Insights.

Taking a Look at Computer Vision’s Object Detection | AI Show

Take a quick tour of computer vision and see an example of how we used a custom vision, object detection model to solve a fun use case.

Why Should I Care About Data Preparation? | AI Show

Data Preparation is generally regarded as taking 80% of the resources for an advanced analytics project, but does it really. Why is it so hard? What's the difference between prepping and modelling? What is featurization and how does it fit in? All these questions and more will be answered in the show, we will even shock and wow Seth with some demos.

How to build a photo sharing mobile app using Xamarin and Azure Functions | Azure Makers Series

Create your own photo-sharing social media platform with Visual Studio Tools for Xamarin and Azure. Learn how to build a mobile app that runs on iOS, Android, and Windows, complete with a serverless backend and photo storage! You can even add AI capabilities to moderate content, add photo captions, and more.

Thumbnail from How to build a photo sharing mobile app using Xamarin and Azure Functions on YouTube

How to create a HTTP Trigger with Azure Logic Apps | Azure Tips and Tricks

Learn how to create a HTTP Request Trigger that is inside an Azure Logic App. You will also learn how to apply a JSON Schema to validate the HTTP Requests.

Thumbnail from How to create a HTTP Trigger with Azure Logic Apps - Azure Tips and Tricks on YouTube

Talking Azure DevOps at the Microsoft Ignite Event 2018 - Episode 010 | The Azure DevOps Podcast

This episode Jeffrey Palermo brings you a live recording from the Microsoft Ignite event. Today, he’s talking with several people, including Greg Leonardo, an Azure MVP and Cloud Architect; Josh Gaverick, an MVP in Application Lifecycle Management and an Senior Application Architect at 10th Magnitude; Rob Richardson, a Microsoft MVP in ASP.NET who also builds web properties for small and medium sized businesses; and Colin Dembovsky, an ALM MVP and Cloud Solution Architect at 10th Magnitude.

Technical content

Getting started with Azure Cognitive Services in containers

As covered above in Bringing AI to the edge, Azure Cognitive Services containers are now in preview. Containerization helps developers build big AI systems that run at scale, reliably, and consistently in a way that supports better data governance. Check out this post to learn how you can get started using them today.

Screenshot of training images for identifying the Microsoft logo

Developing hybrid applications with Azure Stack

Get an overview of developing hybrid applications with Azure Stack, which is an extension of Azure that brings the innovation of cloud computing to build and deploy hybrid applications anywhere. Learn how you can focus on creating code for your solution rather than researching which resource types, API versions, and clouds work together. Use API profiles to enable your code to work across the Azure clouds that support your specific profile. Download the Azure Stack Developer Kit and check out the resources listed in this blog post to get started.

Holiday season is DDoS season

The holiday season is an enticing time for hackers thanks to the combination of increased traffic volume due to an uptick in eCommerce that helps disguise hackers from detection, and reduced staff. All of which makes this time of year too attractive for cyber-criminals to pass up. Learn how Azure DDoS Protection provides countermeasures against the most sophisticated DDoS threats. The service also provides enhanced DDoS mitigation capabilities for your application and resources deployed in your virtual networks.

Four operational practices Microsoft uses to secure the Azure platform

Learn how Microsoft Azure can help you gain security expertise without additional investment through our operational best practices and a global team of over 3,500 cybersecurity experts. This post takes a look at four operational practices our security experts follow to help ensure your data is secure: secure development practices; restricted and just-in-time administrator access and secure access workstations; fast and expert responses to threats, and a team of cyber security experts.

Additional technical content

Events

Join Azure at Supercomputing 2018

Every year at Supercomputing, over 12,000 researchers and practitioners come together to push the state of the art in high-performance computing forward. Microsoft joined the global HPC community in Dallas this week at SC18. This post includes links to our various presentations and activities.

How to get involved in the Azure Monitor AMA!

On Thursday, November 15th, the Azure Monitor team hosted an AMA session on Twitter. You can read through the questions and answers by searching Twitter for #AzureMonitorAMA.

Industries and government

Five lessons for building your roadmap to a secure hybrid cloud future

Microsoft’s own experience moving to the cloud, as well as working extensively with government agencies, offers several useful lessons to CIOs and IT leaders for developing a successful roadmap to a multi-cloud and hybrid IT world. Based on this experience, Susie Adams Chief Technology Officer, Microsoft Federal, covers five recommendations in this post for a successful roadmap, including: rationalize apps; build a solid foundation; use built-in services; establish an identity layer, and adopt an assume-breach strategy.

Three surprising IoT trends in smart buildings

There’s a growing demand for smart buildings which offer multiple benefits for building owners, managers, and tenants. Some of the trends, scenarios, and payoffs just might surprise you. The applications for IoT and smart buildings are seemingly endless. To explore smart buildings in more detail, be sure to register for our IoT in Action webinar, IoT Is Smart for Your Buildings on November 29, 2018 to explore how you can harness IoT to revolutionize building performance. Find links to more resources, including a two-day IoT in Action Virtual Bootcamp, in this post.

Customers and partners

Power bat: How Spektacom is revolutionizing the game of cricket with Microsoft AI

Spektacom was born with the idea of using non-intrusive sensor technology on cricket bat to harness and power the convergence of data from sticker of “power bats” with insights driven from cloud-powered data analytics, machine learning, and artificial intelligence. Spektacom's "power bats" is an innovative sensor-powered sticker that measures the quality of a player’s shot by capturing data and analyzing impact characteristics through wireless sensor technology and cloud analytics. This unique non-intrusive sensor platform weighing less than 5 grams is stuck behind the bat as a sticker to measure the quality, speed, twist, and swing of the bat and the power transferred from the ball to bat at impact.

Animated GIF showing how "power bats" track performance data

View chooses Microsoft Azure IoT to accelerate development of smart building applications

Announces a new partnership between Microsoft and View to develop innovative applications for smart buildings. As part of this partnership, View will leverage their expertise in smart buildings and utilize multiple aspects of the Azure IoT platform to accelerate their solutions development. For example, View will leverage Azure Digital Twins for access control and other smart buildings applications, as well as Azure IoT Edge and Azure Sphere for its window and floor controller devices. The first solution, View SmartProtect, is being announced today. View SmartProtect is a smart window-based, building security solution that automatically and instantaneously detects glass breakage.

Taboola Improves customer experiences with Azure Data Explorer

At PASS Summit 2018, Taboola, a discovery platform, shared how they are tackling the challenge of taking billions of lines of log data, exploring it to identify and act on hidden gems of information with the help of Azure Data Explorer, a lightning fast service optimized for data exploration. Azure Data Explorer allows users to get instant visibility into very large, raw datasets in near-real time to analyze performance, identify trends and anomalies, and diagnose problems.

Monitor your Azure Open Source Databases (PostgreSQL and MySQL) using Azure Monitor

Azure Database for PostgreSQL and MySQL service is a fully managed, enterprise-ready cloud service which emits the performance metrics and telemetry log to Azure Monitor service. Datadog is an essential monitoring platform for cloud applications. Datadog’s vendor supported integrations with Azure Database for MySQL and Azure Database for PostgreSQL collect time series metrics, metadata, and custom tags from Azure Monitor and Azure Resource Manager to allow for flexible dashboarding, alerting and analytics. Additionally, Datadog has agent-level PostgreSQL and MySQL integrations that collect deeper and more fine-grained database metrics and logs.


A Cloud Guru’s This Week in Azure | 16 November 2018

This time on Azure This Week, Lars talks about Azure SQL Data Warehouse’s new productivity and security capabilities. He also discusses Static Data Masking for Azure SQL Database and SQL Server. Finally, he talks about the preview of Machine Learning Services with R support in Azure SQL Database.

Thumbnail from A Cloud Guru's This Week in Azure for 16 November 2018 on YouTube


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Building Your Own Data Science Platform With Python & Docker

Programmierung vom 18.11.2018 um 19:00 Uhr | Quelle youtube.com

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WebAssembly and Blazor: Re-assembling the Web

Programmierung vom 17.11.2018 um 19:00 Uhr | Quelle youtube.com

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2019 Developers Unconference, New York

Programmierung vom 17.11.2018 um 13:35 Uhr | Quelle mariadb.org

February in New York City is again MariaDB time, and the first MariaDB Developers Unconference of 2019 will take place on Saturday 23 and Sunday 24 February, with Hudson River Trading as kind hosts. The event is free to attend and you can join for the entire weekend, or as little time as you wish. […]

The post 2019 Developers Unconference, New York appeared first on MariaDB.org.


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Because it’s Friday: The physics of The Expanse

Programmierung vom 16.11.2018 um 23:08 Uhr | Quelle blog.revolutionanalytics.com

For a science fiction show set hundreds of years in the future, The Expanse is unusual in that it takes very few liberties with Science as we understand it today. The solar system is made up of the familiar planets we know (other than the colonists and space stations spread throughout the system), communication is limited by the speed of light, and and spaceships operate under standard Newtonian principles. You can get a good sense in this highlight reel of the visual effects of the show:

The series was recently saved from cancellation by Amazon: the first three series are streaming on Amazon Prime now (in the US at least) and I can't wait for the fourth season and the continuation of the excellent story, which hews closely to the source novels.

That's all from from the blog for this week. Next week will be a short week for us with US Thanksgiving coming up: if you're celebrating, have a great holiday!

 


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Top Stories from the Microsoft DevOps Community – 2018.11.16

Programmierung vom 16.11.2018 um 22:58 Uhr | Quelle blogs.msdn.microsoft.com

Happy Friday! Sure you’re getting ready to call it a day and start enjoying your weekend, but before you do, don’t miss these excellent articles about DevOps on the Microsoft platform.

Introducing the Azure Blockchain Development Kit
What does Blockchain have to do with DevOps? The new Azure Blockchain Development Kit has samples for how to use blockchain to enable a number of scenarios and – of course – examples on how to develop blockchain applications with an eye toward CI/CD in consortium environments.

Microsoft Connect(); 2018
Microsoft Connect is coming December 4 – a completely online, fully virtual event to talk about software development on Azure, with Visual Studio and enabling AI and ML. I’ll be there – will you?

Azure Webinar: Go from Code to Cloud
This webinar will introduce you to DevOps workflows in Azure, and how you can automate software delivery to deploy, monitor and manage applications in the cloud.

Automated E2E Tests With Selenium And Aspnet Core On Azure DevOps
Rémi Bourgarel has end-to-end tests with Selenium WebDriver for his project, Toss. And he shows you how to set up an Azure Pipeline that runs his Selenium tests for continuous integration testing.

Tips on granular migrations with the Migration Tools for Azure DevOps
Matteo Emili has some tips and tricks based on his experience using the Migration Tools for performing large migrations between TFS and Azure DevOps instances, and especially how to do granular migrations without downtime.

Lynda: Learning Azure DevOps
Whether you’re just getting started with Azure DevOps or you want to level up, this new training course by Jose Miguel Rady Allende is a great way to learn the complete breadth of all the Azure DevOps products.

Did you write an article about Azure DevOps or find some great content about DevOps on Azure? Let me know! I’m @ethomson on Twitter.


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Create a tap reveal button to show hidden data

Programmierung vom 16.11.2018 um 20:04 Uhr | Quelle program.developer.samsung.com
Looking to design a watch face that gives the user the ability to customize the look by revealing specific data? Creating a Tap Reveal button is a simple way. Tap Reveal is when you have certain areas on your watch face that when touched, reveal something else. This can be useful if you would like […]
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Learn Quantum Computing with the Quantum Katas

Programmierung vom 16.11.2018 um 19:00 Uhr | Quelle blogs.msdn.microsoft.com

I started to learn quantum computing when I joined Microsoft Quantum team less then two years ago. Before that the most exposure I had to the topic was a course on quantum mechanics back in the university, which was long enough ago to not count. Upon joining I was immediately presented with a brand-new copy of “Quantum Computation and Quantum Information” by Nielsen and Chuang. I spent probably a month trying to read it, but inevitably got stuck somewhere around chapter 4 feeling that I hadn’t made much progress.

There were several problems with the book – or, more likely, with this style of learning. First, the exercises in the book didn’t have answers, or any hints for that matter. Once I solved a problem, I had no idea whether my approach was correct, and if I was stuck, I was on my own. I was lucky to have access to a whole team of quantum computing experts, whom I could pester with my questions; most people who want to learn quantum computing on their own don’t have this luxury. Second, the book approaches a lot of things from a theoretical point of view, and I don’t believe you can truly master an algorithm – quantum or classical – until you’ve actually implemented it. There is a world of difference between reading explanations and formulas or even following the calculations with pen and paper and writing the code, making mistakes and finding them, seeing how it behaves on different inputs and so on.

Of course, one can (and should) turn to other sources for the exercises. I’ve greatly enjoyed the Quantum Information Science courses by MIT on EdX, since they had interesting problem sets with solution verification. But still I felt that there should be more to teaching quantum computing than that…

Last winter, after we released the Quantum Development Kit 0.1, I started to think about how to help people learn Q# – and for that they would need to learn quantum computing. Examples and library code showing algorithms’ implementations or step-by-step follow-along tutorials like Writing a quantum program were clearly not sufficient, since they lacked the learn-by-doing aspect, giving the learner neither motivation nor framework to experiment on their own.

And then I recalled FSharpKoans through which I went the previous year when learning F#. Those were really good – fun and engaging (who doesn’t love fixing things?) while useful for learning the syntax and concepts of the language. Could we do something like that for Q#?

Fast forward several months: we proudly presented the Quantum Katas – an open-source project aimed at teaching quantum computing and Q# programming.

Working with the Quantum Katas in Visual Studio Working with the Quantum Katas in Visual Studio
The Quantum Katas follow several key principles.

Learning by doing

Each kata offers you programming exercises on one topic or a set of closely related topics. They don’t offer you the theory on these topics – for that they send you to external sources like lecture notes or Wikipedia (you’re also most welcome to find your own favorite resource). Once you’ve gone through the theory, you dive into the exercises to internalize your newly gained knowledge. Each task requires you to write a fragment of code to implement something you’ve learned.

Immediate feedback

Each kata includes a testing framework which validates your solutions to the tasks as soon as you write them. The level of detail provided varies from topic to topic: if the problem asks you to create a certain superposition state, you’ll know only whether the state you created was correct or not (and if it was not, you can use debugging tools like DumpMachine to see what state you created); if the problem asks you to perform quantum state discrimination, you’ll know what percentage of the given states you’ve misclassified, and so on.

Increasing task complexity

The tasks in each kata start simple and gradually increase in complexity, building up on the previous ones. The Superposition kata, for example, starts with really simple tasks – create a |+⟩ or a |-⟩ state – and builds up to creating a W state, which requires using recursion and some clever rotations or even more clever post-selection tricks.

End-to-end algorithm implementation

If you want to master a classical algorithm, you don’t implement the algorithm alone – you also write some unit tests to run it and verify that your implementation works (at least you should). The same goes for quantum algorithms: if a kata covers an oracle algorithm like Grover’s search or a protocol like teleportation, it will take you through all the steps:

  • writing an oracle in the right format for the algorithm or preparing the shared resources for the protocol,
  • implementing the algorithm itself,
  • putting all the pieces together to run the algorithm or the protocol and to check that you get the expected result.

The Quantum Katas project is still in its early stages – there are only 10 katas, covering the introductory topics – but it has already proven itself quite useful. We’ve used the katas in several guided workshops, where the hands-on work with them was preceded by a lecture on the necessary quantum computing concepts, with great success. And personally I felt that I really understood the Grover’s algorithm only after I test-solved the respective kata contributed in October ?

Speaking of contributions… If you have an idea for a nice new task or even a whole new kata, let us know and we’ll be happy to help you implement it!

Useful Links

Mariia Mykhailova, Senior Software Engineer, Quantum
@tcnickolas

Mariia Mykhailova is a software engineer at the Quantum Architectures and Computation group at Microsoft. She focuses on developer outreach and education work for the Microsoft Quantum Development Kit. In her spare time she writes problems for programming competitions and creates puzzles.

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Razor support in Visual Studio Code now in Preview

Programmierung vom 16.11.2018 um 19:00 Uhr | Quelle blogs.msdn.microsoft.com

Earlier this week we released a preview of support for working with Razor files (.cshtml) in the C# extension for Visual Studio Code (1.17.1). This initial release introduces C# completions, directive completions, and basic diagnostics (red squiggles for errors) for ASP.NET Core projects.

Prerequisites

To use this preview of Razor support in Visual Studio Code install the following:

If you already installed VS Code and the C# extension in the past, make sure you have updated to the latest versions of both.

Get started

To try out the new Razor tooling, create a new ASP.NET Core web app and then edit any Razor (.cshtml) file.

  1. Open Visual Studio Code
  2. Select Terminal > New Terminal
  3. In the new terminal run:

    dotnet new webapp -o WebApp1`
    code -r WebApp1
    
  4. Open About.cshtml

  5. Try out HTML completions

    HTML completions

  6. And Razor directive completions

    Directive completions

  7. And C# completions

    C# completions

  8. You also get diagnostics (red squiggles)

    C# diagnostics

Limitations and known issues

This is the first alpha release of the Razor tooling for Visual Studio Code, so there are a number of limitations and known issues:

  • Razor editing is currently only supported in ASP.NET Core projects (no support for ASP.NET projects or Blazor projects yet)
  • Support for tag helpers and formatting is not yet implemented
  • Limited support for colorization
  • Loss of HTML completions following C# less than (<) operator
  • Error squiggles misaligned for expressions near the start of a new line
  • Incorrect errors in Blazor projects for event bindings
  • Emmet based abbreviation expansion is not yet supported

Note that if you need to disable the Razor tooling for any reason:

  • Open the Visual Studio Code User Settings: File -> Preferences -> Settings
  • Search for "razor"
  • Check the "Razor: Disabled" checkbox

Feedback

Even though the functionality of Razor tooling is currently pretty limited, we are shipping this preview now so that we can start collecting feedback. Any issues or suggestions for the Razor tooling in Visual Studio Code should be reported on the https://github.com/aspnet/Razor.VSCode repo.

To help us diagnose any reported issues please provide the following information in the GitHub issue:

  1. Razor (cshtml) file content
  2. Generated C# code from the Razor CSharp output
    • Right-click inside your .cshtml file and select "Command Palette"
    • Search for and select "Razor: Show Razor CSharp"
  3. Verbose Razor log output
    • See instructions for capturing the Razor log output here
  4. OmniSharp log output
    • Open VS Code's "Output" pane
    • In the dropdown choose "OmniSharp Log"

What's next?

Next up we are working on tag helper support. This will include support for tag helper completions and IntelliSense. Once we have tag helper tooling support in place we can then start work on enabling Blazor tooling support as well. Follow our progress and join in the conversation on the https://github.com/aspnet/Razor.VSCode repo.

Thanks for trying out this early preview!


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Introducing Emoji8

Programmierung vom 16.11.2018 um 19:00 Uhr | Quelle blogs.windows.com

Emoji 8 Logo.

How can I make machine learning fun and approachable for my non-tech-savvy friends and family? How can I make an app that maximizes the usage of my Windows 10 hardware? How can I test out my craziest facial expressions and get them scored by science?

Emoji8, now available for free in the Microsoft Store and open-sourced on GitHub, can answer all of these questions and more!

What is Emoji8?

Emoji8 is sample UWP application that uses Windows Machine Learning to evaluate your facial expressions while you imitate a random selection of emojis. The app takes in a video feed from your computer’s webcam and evaluates the images with the FER+ Emotion Recognition model version 1.2 locally on your machine. You can tweet a gif summarizing your best scoring pics when you have an internet connection and continue playing even when you don’t have one!

This app will give you a great end-to-end example of how you can use the Windows ML APIs to create simple yet magical experiences.

Getting Started

To download Emoji8 from the Store, make sure you’re using the Windows 10 October 2018 Update.

To start playing with its open-source code, make sure Visual Studio 2017 (Version 15.7.4 or newer) is installed with the Windows 10 SDK Build 17763.

Providing Feedback

Because Emoji8 is open-source, we highly encourage the community to submit any PRs with changes or enhancements.

Staying Informed

To stay up to date with Emoji8 news, follow @killianqueue on Twitter!

The post Introducing Emoji8 appeared first on Windows Developer Blog.


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PWA: Performance Optimization For Progressive Web Apps

Programmierung vom 16.11.2018 um 18:45 Uhr | Quelle youtube.com

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Black Friday on Bing: intelligent shopping, product insights, and more

Programmierung vom 16.11.2018 um 17:59 Uhr | Quelle blogs.bing.com

Intelligent shopping


We know that often, shopping can be a journey. You might start with a need in mind, or a few products you want to learn about. To end up with a great purchase, you need the right tools to guide you along the way. To make your holiday shopping easier, we’ve embedded Bing artificial intelligence algorithms into parts of our shopping experience to deliver results that are both relevant and organized, to help you make the most efficient purchasing decision.
 

Black Friday


With Black Friday and Cyber Monday just around the corner, we want to make sure you have access to the best deals across many of the top retailers—without the stress of having to clip coupons.

We’ve designed browsable Black Friday infographics, organized and categorized for shopping convenience from your desktop or phone. Search our repository for a specific store to find the best prices for the items you are looking for, and Bing automatically extracts deals from the flyer image.

Our Black Friday experience highlights important info, such as how long an offer lasts, nearby stores, or other ongoing promotions, so that you never miss a bargain this holiday season. To find Back Friday details from our regular Bing shopping tab, simply search on “Black Friday” and the name of the store or item you are searching for. 
 

BlackFriday2.png

Also, keep an eye on this page after Black Friday as we’re adding more stores, more offers, and different promotions throughout the holidays. 

BlackFriday1.png

 

Phone comparisons


We know that smartphones are one of the most common, and most expensive, purchases made during the holiday, and Black Friday is often the peak time for product deals. With so many different options available on the market today, it can be tough to understand the differences between each model to find the one best suited to your needs. 

Comparison shop with Bing by searching, for example, “iPhone x vs Samsung galaxy s9” and Bing serves up information from authoritative sources such as ratings, expert reviews, and product highlights to accurately compare a variety of different product models in a way that’s easy to digest and browse.


PhoneCompare.png


Product insights 


With so many new products and devices available during the holidays, even shopping online can become overwhelming. We want to help you better understand the buzz around new products, as well as the key features, ratings, and reviews to make an informed and stress-free purchasing decision. Simply type what you are looking for into Bing, such as “best laptops,” and you’ll see the product insights synthesized for you automatically.

ProductInsights.png


Happy shopping!

 

Whether you’ve been planning for Black Friday since July or are more of a last-minute shopper, we hope that Bing’s intelligent features will help you make more efficient and stress-free decisions this holiday season—saving you time and money. 

Stay tuned for more features as the holidays progress.


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Report from the Enterprise Applications of the R Language conference  

Programmierung vom 16.11.2018 um 17:00 Uhr | Quelle blog.revolutionanalytics.com

by Mark Niemann-Ross 

Mango Solutions presented the EARL conference in Seattle this November and I was fortunate enough to have time to attend. During the conference I took notes on the presentations, which I’ll pass along to you.

Thoughts on the future of R in industry

The EARL conference started with a panel discussion on R. Moderated by Doug Ashton from Mango Solutions, the panel included Julia Silge with Stack Overflow, David Smith with Microsoft, and Joe Cheng with Rstudio.

Topics ranged from the tidyverse, R certification, R as a general purpose language, Shiny, and the future of R. I captured some interesting quotes from the panel members:

Regarding R certification, David Smith points out that certifications are important for big companies trying to filter employment applications. He mentions that certification is a minimum bar for some HR departments. Julia Silge mentions that Stack Overflow has found certifications to be less influential in the hiring process.

R as a general purpose language: Joe Cheng feels that R is useful for more than just statistics, but that Rstudio isn’t interested in developing general purpose tools. There was discussion around Python as the “second best” language for a lot of applications, and an agreement that R should remain focused on data science.

Most interesting was the discussion regarding the future of R. Julia Silge points out that Stack Overflow data shows R growing fast year over year — at about the same rate as Python. There are a lot of new users and packages need to take that into account.

I learned more about Natural Language Processing

Tim Oldfield introduces this conference as NOT a code-based conference. However, Julia Silge doesn't hesitate to illustrate her discussion with appropriate code. And seriously, how would you discuss natural language processing without using the language of the trade?

I won't get into the terms (TF-IDF) and technology (tidytext) of Mz Silge's presentation. I will mention she does a great job of summarizing how and why to perform text mining. Like all good tech, you can easily scratch the surface of text mining in fifteen minutes. A thorough understanding requires years of hard research. If you'd like an introduction to her work, take a look at her paper She Giggles, He Gallops - analyzing gender tropes in film.

Silge

I gained an understanding of machine-learning

David Smith with Microsoft presented a session on neural nets, machine learning and transfer learning. More than just a theoretical chat, David illustrated the concepts with working tools. I’ve read quite a bit about machine learning – but this illustration really brings it home. Oh — and it’s pretty damn funny. ( David posted this on a blog entry here )

CNN

I learned to (sort of) love Excel

Eina Ooka found herself forced to incorporate Excel with her data workflow. Now — we all have opinions about Excel in data science — but Eina points out that for multidisciplinary data science teams, it’s good for data storage, modeling, and reports. There are issues about reproducibility and source control and for that, R is a good solution. But Eina summarizes that excel is still useful. Not all projects can move away from it.

Data science teams without structured, intentional collaboration leak knowledge and waste resources

Stephanie Kirmer  provided real-life experience and lessons learned on Data Science teams. Her themes included collaboration, version control, reproducibility, institutional knowledge, and other concerns. She has accomplished this with the consistent use of R packages.

One of her most interesting concepts was using packages to capture institutional knowledge. Documenting procedures with a function, contained in a standardized package provides stability and a common tool. This package then becomes an on-boarding tool for new hires and a knowledge repository for departing staff.

I learned risk can be studied and quantified

Risk is the chance that something bad will happen. David Severski with Starbucks revealed some of the tools used by the coffee giant, specifically OpenFAIR (Open Factor Analysis of Information Risk) and EvaluatoR (an R package for risk evaluation). Dave points out that R is an elegant language for data tasks. It has an ecosystem of tools for simulations and statistics, making risk evaluation a plug-and-play process.

Personally, I don’t have call for risk evaluation. But it’s interesting to get a quick peek into the language and concerns of this specialty.

I was reminded of the Science in Data Science

Mark Gallivan reminds us about the science in data science. He researched the effect of Zika on travel by searching twitter for #babymoon. With that data, he cross-references on the geolocation of the tweet to draw conclusions of the impact of Zika on travel plans of pregnant women. This is one of those useful presentations on the nuts and bolts of research.

I gained knowledge for non-R conversations

On November 7th I attended the EARL (Enterprise Applications of the R Language) conference in Seattle. Two days later I attended Orycon, the annual science fiction convention in Portland, Oregon. After every conference I attend, I do a private post-mortem. I ask myself if the conference was worthwhile, if I’d attend again, and if my time was well-spent.

EARL is a deep dive into the application of the R language. Attendees are assumed to have deep understanding of R, statistics, and a domain knowledge; the quintessential definition of data science.

Orycon is a gathering of science fiction fans. It includes a crowd of cosplayers imitating the latest Star Wars characters — but I’ll ignore them for this discussion. To be clear, the people that appreciate science fiction are deeply involved in science fact.

As a result of attending EARL, I’m better prepared to understand the talent and experience slightly under the radar at Orycon. I already knew the methods the experts used to perform and document their research. Thanks to David Smith’s “not hotdog” I understand machine learning at an operational level, so can skip over that discussion — or correct bad science from a misinformed espouser of pseudo-fact.

Mark is an author, educator, and writer and teaches about R and Raspberry Pi at LinkedIn Learning.


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Taboola Improves customer experiences with Azure Data Explorer

Programmierung vom 16.11.2018 um 14:00 Uhr | Quelle azure.microsoft.com

How can you take billions of lines of log data, explore it to identify those hidden gems of information, and act on those insights instantly to improve your customers’ experience, enhance your products, and maintain a competitive advantage in a digital-first world?

This past week at PASS Summit 2018, Taboola, a discovery platform, shared how they are tackling this with the help of Azure Data Explorer, a lightning fast service optimized for data exploration. Azure Data Explorer allows users to get instant visibility into very large, raw datasets in near-real time to analyze performance, identify trends and anomalies, and diagnose problems.

Staying competitive

Taboola delivers personalized recommendations to more than one billion users every month, rendering 3 billion web pages daily on many of the web’s most innovative and highly visited websites. Thousands of leading publishers, marketers, and agencies utilize Taboola’s predictive technology to increase user engagement, monetize their traffic, and distribute their content to engaged audiences across the web. Ensuring customers achieve maximum success from their campaigns is crucial to Taboola’s success.

Taboola’s data generates more than 22 billion records of edge delivery logs daily. Taboola needed a way to quickly, simply, and cost-effectively analyze this edge delivery log data to continuously improve their service with reliable, top performing content recommendations. Its previous solution consisted of several technologies stitched together from different vendors to store, manage, and query their data. This solution was complex and costly to use.

Simple insights

Following a demo of Azure Data Explorer and some testing using a days’ worth of log data, Taboola found that they could get fast answers to in-depth queries on the data.

Taboola relies on Fastly to deliver fast, secure, and scalable online experiences with its edge cloud platform. Utilizing Fastly’s edge cloud to stream the real-time logs directly into Azure Blob Storage, Taboola configured their Azure Data Explorer service to automatically ingest that data. This solution outperforms their previous solution with a faster update time and an intuitive interactive interface.

“The solution was so simple that we were up and running in a week, ingesting and analyzing 17 TB of data per day,” says Vice President of IT at Taboola, Ariel Pisetzky.

Fast time to business value

Taboola has immediately been able to put their insights to work to improve their customers’ experiences. Taboola is now able to more quickly analyze performance, identify trends and anomalies, and diagnose problems in near-real time. One such example is how Taboola was able to instantly identify a problematic latency issue impacting the speed at which content was being served to their customers, and quickly make the correction.

“The ability to do this in near real time, running queries constantly against the system is something we could not do before,” says Pisetzky.

Another example is how Taboola is leveraging these instant insights to help Taboola’s R&D team make advances in their product, influencing the design of new algorithms, and the generation of new ideas.

The fast deployment, short learning curve, and empowering pricing model are just some of the contributing factors that Pisetzky shared as to how Azure Data Explorer is helping the business. While just a few weeks in deployment, Taboola is already able to estimate savings of an entire headcount with Azure Data Explorer versus their previous solution – a head count that can be re-allocated to driving business innovation!

To find out more about Azure Data Explorer you can:


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Blazor 0.7.0 erschienen

Programmierung vom 16.11.2018 um 12:46 Uhr | Quelle microsoft.com
Blazor ist in Version 0.7.0 ist verfügbar. Die neue Version konzentriert sich auf die Koordination von Komponenten über Ancestor-Descendent-Beziehungen. Außerdem wurden einige Verbesserungen beim Debugging vorgenommen. Neuerungen in Version Blazor 0.7.0 sind: Kaskadieren von Werten und Parametern Verbesserungen beim Debuggen Eine vollständige Liste der Änderungen in dieser Version finden Sie in...
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Kalenderwoche 46/2018 für Entwickler im Rückblick: KI für Edge, Blockchain, Update für Visual Studio 2017 und mehr

Programmierung vom 16.11.2018 um 11:00 Uhr | Quelle microsoft.com
Was hat sich in der vergangenen Woche für Entwickler getan? Gab es wichtige Ankündigungen oder neue Wissensressourcen? Unser TechWiese-Team hat zehn interessante Links für Sie zusammengestellt. Viel Spaß beim Stöbern! Künstliche Intelligenz für Edge Computing (engl.) ...
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App Center Diagnostics allgemein verfügbar

Programmierung vom 16.11.2018 um 10:00 Uhr | Quelle microsoft.com
Der Dienst "App Center Diagnostics" ist allgemein verfügbar. Seit der Vorschau-Version wurde intensiv an der Verbesserung von App Center Diagnostics gearbeitet, um den Dienst robuster, performanter und skalierbarer zu machen. Dank Community-Feedback konnte eine konsolidierte Benutzeroberfläche geschaffen werden, die Abstürze und Fehler in einer Ansicht kombiniert und einen intuitiveren Symbol-Upload bietet. Erfahren Sie mehr über di...
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Compiling C# to WASM with Mono and Blazor then Debugging .NET Source with Remote Debugging in Chrome DevTools

Programmierung vom 16.11.2018 um 03:45 Uhr | Quelle feeds.hanselman.com

Blazor quietly marches on. In case you haven't heard (I've blogged about Blazor before) it's based on a deceptively simple idea - what if we could run .NET Standard code in the browsers? No, not Silverlight, Blazor requires no plugins and doesn't introduce new UI concepts. What if we took the AOT (Ahead of Time) compilation work pioneered by Mono and Xamarin that can compile C# to Web Assembly (WASM) and added a nice UI that embraced HTML and the DOM?

Sound bonkers to you? Are you a hater? Think this solution is dumb or not for you? To the left.

For those of you who want to be wacky and amazing, consider if you can do this and the command line:

$ cat hello.cs

class Hello {
static int Main(string[] args) {
System.Console.WriteLine("hello world!");
return 0;
}
}
$ mcs -nostdlib -noconfig -r:../../dist/lib/mscorlib.dll hello.cs -out:hello.exe
$ mono-wasm -i hello.exe -o output
$ ls output
hello.exe index.html index.js index.wasm mscorlib.dll

Then you could do this in the browser...look closely on the right side there.

You can see the Mono runtime compiled to WASM coming down. Note that Blazor IS NOT compiling your app into WASM. It's sending Mono (compiled as WASM) down to the client, then sending your .NET Standard application DLLs unchanged down to run within with the context of a client side runtime. All using Open Web tools. All Open Source.

Blazor uses Mono to run .NET in the browser

So Blazor allows you to make SPA (Single Page Apps) much like the Angular/Vue/React, etc apps out there today, except you're only writing C# and Razor(HTML).

Consider this basic example.

@page "/counter"


<h1>Counter</h1>
<p>Current count: @currentCount</p>
<button class="btn btn-primary" onclick="@IncrementCount">Click me</button>

@functions {
int currentCount = 0;
void IncrementCount() {
currentCount++;
}
}

You hit the button, it calls some C# that increments a variable. That variable is referenced higher up and automatically updated. This is trivial example. Check out the source for FlightFinder for a real Blazor application.

This is stupid, Scott. How do I debug this mess? I see you're using Chrome but seriously, you're compiling C# and running in the browser with Web Assembly (how prescient) but it's an undebuggable black box of a mess, right?

I say nay nay!

C:UsersscottDesktopsweetsassymollassy> $Env:ASPNETCORE_ENVIRONMENT = "Development"

C:UsersscottDesktopsweetsassymollassy> dotnet run --configuration Debug
Hosting environment: Development
Content root path: C:UsersscottDesktopsweetsassymollassy
Now listening on: http://localhost:5000
Now listening on: https://localhost:5001
Application started. Press Ctrl+C to shut down.

Then Win+R and run this command (after shutting down all the Chrome instances)

%programfiles(x86)%GoogleChromeApplicationchrome.exe --remote-debugging-port=9222 http://localhost:5000

Now with your Blazor app running, hit Shift+ALT+D (or Shift+SILLYMACKEY+D) and behold.

Feel free to click and zoom in. We're at a breakpoint in some C# within a Razor page...in Chrome DevTools.

HOLY CRAP IT IS DEBUGGING C# IN CHROME

What? How?

Blazor provides a debugging proxy that implements the Chrome DevTools Protocol and augments the protocol with .NET-specific information. When debugging keyboard shortcut is pressed, Blazor points the Chrome DevTools at the proxy. The proxy connects to the browser window you're seeking to debug (hence the need to enable remote debugging).

It's just getting started. It's limited, but it's awesome. Amazing work being done by lots of teams all coming together into a lovely new choice for the open source web.


Sponsor: Preview the latest JetBrains Rider with its Assembly Explorer, Git Submodules, SQL language injections, integrated performance profiler and more advanced Unity support.



© 2018 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

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Kubernetes for the ‘klueless’ | Microsoft Connect(); 2018

Programmierung vom 16.11.2018 um 02:59 Uhr | Quelle channel9.msdn.com

What's the big deal with Kubernetes? Find out what it is, and when and how to use it in this fun, demo-filled session.


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Kubernetes for the ‘klueless’ | Microsoft Connect(); 2018

Programmierung vom 16.11.2018 um 02:59 Uhr | Quelle channel9.msdn.com

What's the big deal with Kubernetes? Find out what it is, and when and how to use it in this fun, demo-filled session.


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Keynote (Scott Guthrie) | Microsoft Connect(); 2018

Programmierung vom 16.11.2018 um 02:45 Uhr | Quelle channel9.msdn.com

Demos, demos, and more demos. See Scott Guthrie and others demonstrate how Azure and Visual Studio help you to stay productive and focused on what matters to you.


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Keynote (Scott Guthrie) | Microsoft Connect(); 2018

Programmierung vom 16.11.2018 um 02:45 Uhr | Quelle channel9.msdn.com

Demos, demos, and more demos. See Scott Guthrie and others demonstrate how Azure and Visual Studio help you to stay productive and focused on what matters to you.


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Machine Learning Insights & Applications

Programmierung vom 16.11.2018 um 02:15 Uhr | Quelle youtube.com

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In case you missed it: October 2018 roundup

Programmierung vom 15.11.2018 um 23:17 Uhr | Quelle blog.revolutionanalytics.com

In case you missed them, here are some articles from October of particular interest to R users.

Peter Provost ports some 80's-era BASIC programs for kids to R.

In a podcast for Fringe FM, I discuss the ethics of AI, Microsoft and Open Source, and the R Community.

Roundup of AI, Machine Learning and Data Science news from October 2018.

In this episode of "Guy in a Cube", R is used to visualize Anscombe's Quartet via Power BI.

Di Cook suggests using computer vision to automate statistical model assessment for machine learning in the 2018 Belz Lecture.

R provides the analysis behind a front-page story on bridge safety in the Baltimore Sun.

Tomas Kalibera describes the big impacts of a small tweak to the logical comparison operators in R.

The Economist is now using R to calculate its famous "Big Mac Index".

Behind-the-scenes details of how R gets built on Windows, from a presentation by Jeroen Ooms.

The R Consortium has accepted another round of grant applications for R community projects.

A list of upcoming R conferences.

A recap of AI, Machine Learning and Data Science announcements from the Microsoft Ignite conference.

And some general interest stories (not necessarily related to R):

As always, thanks for the comments and please send any suggestions to me at [email protected]. Don't forget you can follow the blog using an RSS reader, via email using blogtrottr, or by following me on Twitter (I'm @revodavid). You can find roundups of previous months here


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