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HPR2860: Encryption and Quantum Computing

Zur Kategorie wechselnPodcasts vom | Quelle: hackerpublicradio.org Direktlink direkt öffnen

The Quantum Computer is supposed to be a game changer that renders encryption useless. But is this true? We look at how quantum computing will affect encryption going forward, and show that we are already working on quantum-resistant encryption.

Links:


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HPR2859: HPR NYE Show 2018-2019 part 7

Zur Kategorie wechselnPodcasts vom | Quelle: hackerpublicradio.org Direktlink direkt öffnen

Hacker Public Radio New Years Show episode 7

Welcome to the 7th Annual Hacker Public Radio New Years Show. 2018-2019


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HPR2858: Vehicle designer for a space game

Zur Kategorie wechselnPodcasts vom | Quelle: hackerpublicradio.org Direktlink direkt öffnen

This episode is about modeling vehicle designer that can be used to design all kinds of vehicles available in the game. It relates to episode about performing research.

Major parts

Two major parts about vehicle designer are components and chassis.

Components are modular pieces of vehicle that are assembled on chassis. They can, among other things, be things lie star sails, astrolabe navigators or long range sensor. Each component is defined by two values ComponentId and ComponentLevel. If you know these two values, you’ll be able to find out details of the component. ComponentId tells what component it is and ComponentLevel the general knowledge of it. When component is first discovered as a result of research, it’s just a prototype and as a such doesn’t function particularly well. Further research refines it and factories are able to produce higher quality components.

Full definition of component is show below:

data Component = Component
    { componentId :: ComponentId
    , componentLevel :: ComponentLevel
    , componentName :: ComponentName
    , componentDescription :: ComponentDescription
    , componentWeight :: Weight
    , componentSlot :: ComponentSlot
    , componentType :: [ ComponentPower ]
    , componentCost :: RawResources ResourceCost
    , componentChassisType :: ChassisType
    }
    deriving (Show, Read, Eq, Ord)

Two particularly interesting fields are componentSlot and componentType. componentSlot has type of ComponentSlot and defines what kind of slot the component occupies in chassis. As there are limited amount of slots in each chassis, designer needs to make compromises on what components to install. componentType has type of ComponentPower, which defines what component does in general. It could be sensor or provide supplies for the vehicle for example.

Technology requirements are defined by function: componentRequirements :: ComponentId -> Maybe Technology. It defines which technology unlock a given component. Part of the definition is show below. Each and every ComponentId has to be handled.

componentRequirements ShipLongRangeSensors = Just HighSensitivitySensors
componentRequirements ShipBridge = Nothing
componentRequirements VehicleWheeledMotiveSystem = Nothing
componentRequirements VehicleHoverMotiveSystem = Just HoverCrafts
...

Second major part of the designer are chassis. They’re stored in database, as I wanted a bit more flexible system than hardcoding as I did with components. Following piece of configuration is used to define database table and generated data for Haskell code. Most of the fields are probably easy enough to guess. type with type of ChassisType defines if this particular chassis is for example a land vehicle or a space ship. Various slot fields on other hand define amount of particular slots that the chassis offers.

Chassis json
    name ChassisName
    tonnage Weight
    type ChassisType
    technology Technology Maybe
    armourSlots SlotAmount
    innerSlots SlotAmount
    outerSlots SlotAmount
    sensorSlots SlotAmount
    weaponSlots SlotAmount
    engineSlots SlotAmount
    motiveSlots SlotAmount
    sailSlots SlotAmount
    deriving Show Read Eq

Not all chassis are equal and some (probably pretty much every one of them) have some sort of requirements that has to be fulfilled when designing a vehicle. For example, space ships require a bridge for captain and star sails. Bawley, smallest of the working ships has room for two star sails, but requires only one of them to be installed in order to be a valid design. Flyboat on the other hand is smaller ship built for speed and always requires two set of sails.

This data is stored in required_component table and represented as RequiredComponent data. Both are generated from the definition show below:

RequiredComponent json
    chassisId ChassisId
    componentType ComponentType
    level ComponentLevel
    amount ComponentAmount
    deriving Show Read Eq

Designing a vehicle

With all that data, we can now design a vehicle. Process is roughly the following:

  • based on completed research, get a list of chassis that are available
  • select chassis from the list
  • based on the selected chassis and completed research, get a list of components that are available
  • select components to install
  • remember to check that maximum tonnage isn’t exceeded and that there’s enough slots and requirements are met
  • fill in name
  • save into database

Completed design is saved in two different tables. First one design holds info like name of the design, faction that design belongs to and used chassis. planned_component holds info about which components are planned to be installed and in what quantity.

Design json
    name Text
    ownerId FactionId
    chassisId ChassisId
    deriving Show Read Eq

and

PlannedComponent json
    designId DesignId
    componentId ComponentId
    level ComponentLevel
    amount ComponentAmount
    deriving Show Read Eq

As a little teaser, below is an screenshot of what the vehicle designer currently looks like.

Screenshot of vehicle designer showing chassis and components

Finally

Thanks for interest. If you have questions or comments, best way to reach me nowadays is either by email or in fediverse, where I’m [email protected].


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HPR2857: Creating CounterParty Collectible Tokens for the Bitcorn Game

Zur Kategorie wechselnPodcasts vom | Quelle: hackerpublicradio.org Direktlink direkt öffnen

Bitcorn is an idle farming game created with and played using Bitcoin tokens using the CounterParty protocol. I’ll walk you through how it all works, how to get started and what all that means.

In this episode we’ll walk through the basics of creating and submitting a Bitcorn collectible card to be included in the game, along with setting up a wallet so you can buy and sell them.


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HPR2856: Mint Mobile Security Rant

Zur Kategorie wechselnPodcasts vom | Quelle: hackerpublicradio.org Direktlink direkt öffnen

You can also use call forwarding to forward calls to your google voice number. Mint does not seem to stay connected all the time.


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HPR2855: HPR NYE Show 2018-2019 part 6

Zur Kategorie wechselnPodcasts vom | Quelle: hackerpublicradio.org Direktlink direkt öffnen

Hacker Public Radio New Years Show episode 6

Welcome to the 7th Annual Hacker Public Radio New Years Show. 2018-2019


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HPR2854: Telling myself something In The Morning

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HPR2853: Feeding the beast

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HPR2852: Gnu Awk - Part 16

Zur Kategorie wechselnPodcasts vom | Quelle: hackerpublicradio.org Direktlink direkt öffnen

Introduction

This is the sixteenth and final episode of the 'Learning Awk' series which is being produced by b-yeezi (BY) and Dave Morriss (DM).

We are using this as an opportunity to have a round-table discussion about the series, about Awk, and where we recommend the listeners should go from here. Including this one we have produced 16 episodes covering the features most likely to be used in pipelines on the command line or in simple shell and awk scripts.

Note that although the HPR site will list this episode as having a single host, in fact it has two! Plans are afoot to enhance the HPR database so we can eventually indicate this properly.

Topics Discussed

  • The series
    • Started in 2016 (first show released 2016-07-13)
    • Finishing in 2019
    • 16 episodes in total
  • Why are we finishing the series?
    • We have probably reached the limit of what is useful on the command line or in shell scripts or even in manageable-sized Awk scripts
    • Awk shows its limitations as we go on and doesn’t compare well with more modern text processing languages
  • Our personal experiences with Awk
    • BY:
      • Started with sed and awk when first moving to Linux in 2011
      • (ongoing) Exploring and cleaning client data
      • (ongoing) Personal scripts when adding python or other tool would be overkill
    • DM:
      • Working with VAX/VMS in the 1980’s. No very good text processing features built-in, so Gnu Awk (and sed) was a great way to handle the data we were using to generate accounts for new students each year. Could easily spot bad records, do some data validation (for example impossible dates of birth).
      • Later in the late 1980’s and early 1990’s more Unix systems came on the scene running HP-UX, Ultrix, SunOS, Solaris, OSF/1, True64 Unix, and awk was very much used there.
      • Later still we moved to Linux; initially Fedora but later RHEL, and of course awk figured in the list of tools there as well.
  • What have we left out? Why?
    • User-defined functions are pretty clunky and hard to use
    • Multi-dimensional arrays: other languages do this better
    • Internationalization: assumes you’re writing big awk programs
    • The gawk debugger: quite clever but probably overkill for this series
    • Extensions written in C and C++: some come with gawk and look quite good, but this subject is out of scope
  • What to use as an alternative to Awk?
    • DM moved from gawk to Perl (version 4) in the 1980’s and later to Perl version 5. This might have engendered an awky, Bashy mindset that’s hard to shake off. Not the recommended place to start these days.
    • BY moved from gawk to Python and R for large projects. For interactive Bashy exploration, moved to XSV, q, and csv-kit for most use cases.
    • These tools have built-in convenience features, like accounting for headers, data types, and file encodings
  • What’s next?
    • It is planned to turn the notes for this series into a combined document which will be available on the HPR site and on archive.org. There is no timescale for this at the moment

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HPR2851: An introduction to the work of fire fighters

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Some general basic knowledge of fire fighting. Also an invitation to ask questions in the comments.


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HPR2850: NIST Cybersecurity Framework

Zur Kategorie wechselnPodcasts vom | Quelle: hackerpublicradio.org Direktlink direkt öffnen

The National Institute of Standards and Technology of the US Government issued the NIST Cybersecurity Framework, which has recommendations for private companies and mandates for U.S. Government agencies. For people who work in information security in an Enterprise environment, this framework may be of interest, so we will take a walk through it.

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HPR2849: HPR NYE Show 2018-2019 part 5

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Hacker Public Radio New Years Show episode 5

Welcome to the 7th Annual Hacker Public Radio New Years Show. 2018-2019


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HPR2848: Random numbers in Haskell

Zur Kategorie wechselnPodcasts vom | Quelle: hackerpublicradio.org Direktlink direkt öffnen

There’s lots of random and similar sounding words in this episode. I hope you can still follow what I’m trying to explain, but I’m aware that it might be hard.

Haskell functions are pure, meaning that they will always produce same values for same set of arguments. This might sound hard when you want to generate random numbers, but it turns out that the solution isn’t too tricky.

First part to the puzzle is type class RandomGen:

class RandomGen g where
    next :: g -> (Int, g)
    genRange :: g -> (Int, Int)
    split :: g -> (g, g)

next produces tuple, where first element is random Int and second element is new random generator. genRange returns tuple defining minimum and maximum values this generator will return. split produces tuple with two new random generators.

Using RandomGen to produce random values of specific type or for specific range requires a bit of arithmetic. It’s easier to use Random that defines functions for that specific task:

class Random a where
    randomR :: RandomGen g => (a, a) -> g -> (a, g)
    random :: RandomGen g => g -> (a, g)
    randomRs :: RandomGen g => (a, a) -> g -> [a]
    randoms :: RandomGen g => g -> [a]
    randomRIO :: (a, a) -> IO a
    randomIO :: IO a
  • randomR, when given range and random generator, produces tuple with random number and new generator
  • random, is similar but doesn’t take range. Instead it will use minimum and maximum specific to that data type
  • randomRs, takes range and produces infinite list of random values within that range
  • randoms, simply produces infinite list of random values using range that is specific to datatype
  • randomRIO and randomIO are effectful versions that don’t need random generator, but use some default one

In short, RandomGen is source of randomness and Random is datatype specific way of generating random values using random generator RandomGen.

Final part of the puzzle is where to get RandomGen? One could initialize one manually, but then it wouldn’t be random. However, there’s function getStdGen that will seed RandomGen using OS default random number generator, current time or some other method. Since it has signature of getStdGen :: IO StdGen, one can only call it in IO monad.

Functions that operate with IO can only be called from other IO functions. They can call pure functions, but pure functions can’t call them. So there’s two options: have the code that needs random numbers in effectful function or get RandomGen in effectful function and pass it to pure function.

Example

import System.Random
import Data.List

-- | get n unique entries from given list in random order
-- | if n > length of list, all items of the list will be returned
getR :: RandomGen g => g -> Int -> [a] -> [a]
getR g n xs =
    fmap (xs !!) ids
    where
        ids = take (min n $ length xs) $ nub $ randomRs (0, length xs - 1) g

-- | Returns 4 unique numbers between 1 and 10 (inclusive)
test :: IO [Int]
test = do
    g <- getStdGen
    return $ getR g 4 [1..10]

In closing

Pseudo randomness doesn’t require IO, only seeding the generator does. Simple computation that don’t require many calls to random are easy enough. If you need lots of random values, MonadRandom is better suited. It takes care of carrying implicit RandomGen along while your computation progresses.

Best way to catch me nowadays is either email or fediverse where I’m [email protected]


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HPR2847: earbuds

Zur Kategorie wechselnPodcasts vom | Quelle: hackerpublicradio.org Direktlink direkt öffnen

operat0r discusses his trials with earbuds and custom setups.


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HPR2846: HPR Community News for June 2019

Zur Kategorie wechselnPodcasts vom | Quelle: hackerpublicradio.org Direktlink direkt öffnen

New hosts

Welcome to our new host:
Shannon Wright.

Last Month's Shows

Id Day Date Title Host
2826 Mon 2019-06-03 HPR Community News for May 2019 HPR Volunteers
2827 Tue 2019-06-04 Unscripted ramblings from my garage about my first CTF event Christopher M. Hobbs
2828 Wed 2019-06-05 Writing Web Game in Haskell - Science, part 2 tuturto
2829 Thu 2019-06-06 Discussion around fair use clips on HPR Various Hosts
2830 Fri 2019-06-07 HPR NYE Show 2018-2019 part 1 Honkeymagoo
2831 Mon 2019-06-10 Interview with Robbie Ferguson Yannick
2832 Tue 2019-06-11 How I got started in Linux Shannon Wright
2833 Wed 2019-06-12 Jeroen chats with Joep Piscaer Jeroen Baten
2834 Thu 2019-06-13 My favorite desktop and android applications Christopher M. Hobbs
2835 Fri 2019-06-14 HPR NYE Show 2018-2019 part 2 Honkeymagoo
2836 Mon 2019-06-17 Interview with Wendy Hill Yannick
2837 Tue 2019-06-18 parallax live desktops in android operat0r
2838 Wed 2019-06-19 Why Haskell? tuturto
2839 Thu 2019-06-20 Sample episode of the Distrohoppers Digest podcast Ken Fallon
2840 Fri 2019-06-21 HPR NYE Show 2018-2019 part 3 Honkeymagoo
2841 Mon 2019-06-24 How I got into Linux (and then some...) Christopher M. Hobbs
2842 Tue 2019-06-25 What's in my Bag an update to hpr2065 Tony Hughes AKA TonyH1212
2843 Wed 2019-06-26 Afrikan Tähti (or Star of Africa) tuturto
2844 Thu 2019-06-27 The Sony TC-222-A Portable Reel-To-Reel Tape Recorder Jon Kulp
2845 Fri 2019-06-28 HPR NYE Show 2018-2019 part 4 Honkeymagoo

Comments this month

These are comments which have been made during the past month, either to shows released during the month or to past shows. There are 19 comments in total.

Past shows

There is 1 comment on 1 previous show:

  • hpr2807 (2019-05-07) "Are bash local variables local?" by clacke.
    • Comment 1: Dave Morriss on 2019-06-06: "Thanks for this"

This month's shows

There are 18 comments on 8 of this month's shows:

  • hpr2827 (2019-06-04) "Unscripted ramblings from my garage about my first CTF event" by Christopher M. Hobbs.
    • Comment 1: Christopher M. Hobbs on 2019-05-30: "event cancellation"
    • Comment 2: tuturto on 2019-06-04: "sorry to hear about cancellation"

  • hpr2829 (2019-06-06) "Discussion around fair use clips on HPR" by Various Hosts.
    • Comment 1: Joel D on 2019-06-06: "Fair Use"
    • Comment 2: Ken Fallon on 2019-06-07: "We don't know"

  • hpr2830 (2019-06-07) "HPR NYE Show 2018-2019 part 1" by Honkeymagoo.
    • Comment 1: folky on 2019-06-10: "plumble is better than I thought."
    • Comment 2: folky on 2019-06-10: "More %"
    • Comment 3: Dave Morriss on 2019-06-10: "Missing '%' in date command"

  • hpr2831 (2019-06-10) "Interview with Robbie Ferguson" by Yannick.
    • Comment 1: b-yeezi on 2019-06-10: "Just what I was looking for "

  • hpr2832 (2019-06-11) "How I got started in Linux" by Shannon Wright.

  • hpr2833 (2019-06-12) "Jeroen chats with Joep Piscaer" by Jeroen Baten.
    • Comment 1: Ahuka on 2019-06-14: "Great show!"

  • hpr2837 (2019-06-18) "parallax live desktops in android" by operat0r.
    • Comment 1: norrist on 2019-06-18: "I like this kind of episode."

  • hpr2839 (2019-06-20) "Sample episode of the Distrohoppers Digest podcast" by Ken Fallon.
    • Comment 1: Mike Ray on 2019-06-20: "Accessibility"
    • Comment 2: Bob on 2019-06-20: "reply to Mike"
    • Comment 3: Mike Ray on 2019-06-20: "Accessibility and non-English character sets"
    • Comment 4: Tony Hughes on 2019-06-21: "Responce to Mike and Bob"
    • Comment 5: Bob on 2019-06-23: "I wasn't serious"
    • Comment 6: Mike Ray on 2019-06-25: "Accessibility"
    • Comment 7: TonyH1212 on 2019-06-29: "Further responce to Mike and Bob"

Mailing List discussions

Policy decisions surrounding HPR are taken by the community as a whole. This discussion takes place on the Mail List which is open to all HPR listeners and contributors. The discussions are open and available on the HPR server under Mailman.

The threaded discussions this month can be found here:

http://hackerpublicradio.org/pipermail/hpr_hackerpublicradio.org/2019-June/thread.html

Events Calendar

With the kind permission of LWN.net we are linking to The LWN.net Community Calendar.

Quoting the site:

This is the LWN.net community event calendar, where we track events of interest to people using and developing Linux and free software. Clicking on individual events will take you to the appropriate web page.

Any other business

Issue with advanced RSS settings

The page at http://www.hackerpublicradio.org/advanced_rss_settings.php describes a series of features that allow the specification of a tailored RSS feed.

One of the features is 'gomax=1' which includes shows in the queue scheduled for the future. For example, the following URL requests 30 OGG format shows including those scheduled for the future:

http://hackerpublicradio.org/rss.php?format=ogg&gomax=1&limit=30

However, there is a problem with this, caused by the way we direct downloads to archive.org. We usually upload the next week’s shows to archive.org, but not all future shows as they arrive. This means that the links to some future shows returned by the feed point to currently non-existent episodes.

This has been the case ever since we moved to using archive.org in this way, in late 2017. We have not received any comments or complaints about it in that time, so the question is:

Does anyone use 'gomax=1'?

Tags and Summaries

Thanks to the following contributor for sending in updates in the past month: Tony Hughes

Over the period tags and/or summaries have been added to 6 shows which were without them.

If you would like to contribute to the tag/summary project visit the summary page at https://hackerpublicradio.org/report_missing_tags.php and follow the instructions there.


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HPR2845: HPR NYE Show 2018-2019 part 4

Zur Kategorie wechselnPodcasts vom | Quelle: hackerpublicradio.org Direktlink direkt öffnen

Hacker Public Radio New Years Show episode 4

Welcome to the 7th Annual Hacker Public Radio New Years Show. 2018-2019


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HPR2844: The Sony TC-222-A Portable Reel-To-Reel Tape Recorder

Zur Kategorie wechselnPodcasts vom | Quelle: hackerpublicradio.org Direktlink direkt öffnen

In this episode I talk about my new 1969 Sony TC-222-A portable reel-to-reel tape recorder. I found it about 3 weeks ago at Hand-Up Thrift store in Lafayette Louisiana for $5. It was in partially working condition, without a power cord, and in need of some work. I cleaned the contact points, overhauled the fast-forward idler wheel, lubricated both of the tape shafts, replaced the belts, hacked an old electric razor cord to work as a power cord, and tightened up the record linkage. One thing I still can't get working is recording using the microphone.

I spend about half of this episode talking about trying to make a super-long recording fit on a 5-inch reel and playing at 4.8 cm/second. I use Kimiko Ishizaka's wonderful Open Goldberg Variations and Open Well-Tempered Clavier as the music. To do this, I speeded up all of the tracks to play at 4x speed, for which I use the following script to loop through all mp3s in the current directory and subject them to the appropriate sox command:

#!/bin/bash

for i in *.mp3; do
# speed em up 4x
  infile=$(basename $i)
  stem=$(basename "$i" .mp3)
  outfile="$stem"_4x.mp3
  sox $infile $outfile speed 4.0
  sleep .1
done

It worked! Well. The script and sox command worked. Recording the 4x-speed audio at 19 cm/second and then playing back at 4.8 cm/second also mostly worked, I just had a very poor-quality tape so it sounded pretty bad. The speed was just about right, though. In fact when I compared pitch against my piano, it was EXACTLY right. I may try again with a better tape. (BTW I said my tape was "old new stock," but obviously I meant "new old stock.")

Photo Album (click image)

Sony TC-222-A Portable Reel-to-Reel Tape Recorder

Links


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HPR2843: Afrikan Tähti (or Star of Africa)

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For more information about the game and history behind it, have a look at the following links:


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HPR2842: What's in my Bag an update to hpr2065

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Hello HPR land, this is Tony Hughes again coming to you from Blackpool in the UK.

During my last episode, which was my 50th for HPR, I realized that my ‘Bag’ has changed considerably since recording my episode hpr2065 about it back in July 2016. So this is an update on what I currently carry in my ‘Geek’ Bag when out and about.

I have several laptops which are used for different things at different times so may or may not be in the bag/bags depending on what I am doing. This is the list:

  • Lenovo X230i
  • Toshiba z30
  • Dells E6220 x 2, E7250, E7440 and E6540

Recently I have moved more to Dell laptops and the Dell E7440 is a great compromise of portability and usability with its 14" 1080p screen, but if I want light and long battery life the Toshiba z30 is a fantastic little PC with all day battery life and a great 13.3" screen.

But all the others have their place in the bag, for demonstrating Linux Distros at events or at my LUG.

So the next thing that makes it into the bag is my ZoomH2 recorder that goes with me for recording interviews at events I attend, with the intention of producing HPR shows.

I also have some tools, the first is a little set of a screwdriver and small driver bits made by Draper this is handy for laptop tear downs as it has all the necessary bit heads needed to work on electronics. I also carry a small set of pliers and a wire cutter in the bag.

I also carry a 10000mA battery pack for charging my mobile phone if needed while out and about. In conjunction with this a I carry several micro USB charging cables and a USB C cable for the increasing number of USB C devices around these days.

In the bag are also a couple of 128Gb SSD’s as spares for quick swap outs, if I don’t want to wipe a drive but wish to test a new OS, or for those times the only solution to helping someone rescue an older laptop is to stick an SSD into it.

I generally carry my 1Tb portable USB3 HDD around with me as I store a large number of current Linux ISO files for burning to a flash drive to create boot discs. With that it goes without saying that I have a few spare flash drives in the bag for just this use. I also usually carry a few SD cards for creating Raspberry Pi images if needed.

Other items include a USB WiFi card as a backup if I have a WiFi malfunction, or I’m working on a machine without its own WiFi card.

Well that’s about it for what I’m currently carrying in my bag, but before I go a bit of sad news. Many of you have heard me talk of my latest bargains from the Computer Auction I have frequented since 2006. Well sadly NO MORE, Northern Realisations after 20 years of trading have closed their doors for the last time, so I need to find another source of cheap PC equipment. As they say: All good things come to an end.

Well that’s it for this episode, this is Tony Hughes signing off for Hacker Public Radio.


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HPR2841: How I got into Linux (and then some...)

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Basically what it says on the tin. Most distros I mention can be easily searched for. I meander through a discussion of how I got into Linux and where I am with it now.


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HPR2840: HPR NYE Show 2018-2019 part 3

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Hacker Public Radio New Years Show episode 3

Welcome to the 7th Annual Hacker Public Radio New Years Show. 2018-2019


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HPR2839: Sample episode of the Distrohoppers Digest podcast

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This is a sample episode of the new Creative Commons tech podcast. It's brought to us by Moss and our own Tony Hughes. From the blurb:

We are two Blokes who love Linux and trying out new stuff, we thought it would be interesting to share our experience of trying new Linux and BSD distributions and how we found it trying to live with them as our daily driver for up to a Month at a time, by recording a podcast about how we got on.

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HPR2838: Why Haskell?

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I got really good comment on episode 2778 - Functor and applicative in Haskell from Beeza that I’m including below:

I’ve been writing software for over 30 years but I find the syntax of Haskell anything but intuitive - in fact less so than any other programming language I have looked at. Thanks to your excellent show notes I can make sense of it but I have to say I would not like to have to develop a project using this language.

Obviously I am missing the point as nobody would design a language with the intention of its being difficult to use. Perhaps you could produce another episode addressing the question “Why Haskell?”

In this episode, I’m trying to answer to that from my point of view.


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HPR2837: parallax live desktops in android

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parallax live desktops in android


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HPR2836: Interview with Wendy Hill

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Wendy Hill is a photographer. And by that, I don’t mean she takes pictures of her kids on Sundays at the baseball game. Although, if she was to do that, it would probably turn out to be great pictures. No, Wendy is a professional photographer, and to run her business, she uses free and opensource software.

Wait… no Photoshop? No Illustrator? How is that possible? Wendy joined me on Mumble earlier this year – that’s 2019 for you, visitors from the future – and we discussed about that.

Links


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HPR2835: HPR NYE Show 2018-2019 part 2

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Hacker Public Radio New Years Show episode 2


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HPR2834: My favorite desktop and android applications

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Desktop:

  • xfce4-terminal
  • globaltime (orage)
  • xfce4 notes
  • thunar
  • firefox
  • Emacs
  • claws-mail
  • weechat
  • mupdf
  • gtk-redshift
  • asunder
  • keepassx
  • lucky backup
  • virtualbox/kvm
  • xlog
  • gpredict
  • arduino ide
  • tor browser bundle
  • ledger wallet
  • xmame
  • freedoom
  • rRootage
  • dia
  • fbreader
  • gnumeric/libreoffice
  • mandelbulber2
  • gqrx
  • transmission
  • xastir
  • youtube-dl gui
  • zenmap
  • mpv

Android

  • LineageOS
  • built in phone
  • signal
  • built in fm radio
  • built in camera
  • 2048
  • acrylic paint
  • amsatdroid free
  • antennapod
  • aprsdroid
  • audiofx
  • barcode scanner
  • binaural beats
  • blockinger
  • blowtorch
  • built in calendar
  • call recorder
  • chroma doze
  • built in clock
  • cloudlibrary
  • built in contacts
  • danmaku death
  • echolink
  • equate
  • f-droid
  • fbreader
  • fennec f-droid
  • red cross first aid
  • flashlight
  • freegal music
  • gadgetbridge
  • built in gallery
  • ghost commander
  • gobandroid
  • hoopla
  • iz2uuf morse code trainer
  • libby
  • lightning
  • mobilinkd tnc
  • mupdf
  • netguard
  • o’reilly
  • orbot, orfox
  • osmand~
  • red cross pet first aid
  • plumble
  • propel graviton
  • radiodroid (radio-browser.info)
  • recorder
  • roblox
  • rpn
  • sealnote
  • sim card
  • simple world clock
  • space trader
  • spotify
  • suntimes, suntimes alarms
  • survival manual
  • termux
  • timber
  • tsumego pro
  • ttrss-reader
  • unifi
  • vlc
  • webtube
  • weechat-android
  • wifianalyzer
  • wikipedia
  • yalp store
  • yorecast

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HPR2833: Jeroen chats with Joep Piscaer

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In this show an Interview with Joep Piscaer, recorded during the recent Loadays conference in Antwerpen, Belgium.

Schedule of recent Loadays event: https://cfp.loadays.org/2019/schedule/

I mention the "Cut the crap podcast", made by Ryan Caligiuri.

And specifically episode 145 as an excellent example of his podcast quality:

https://player.fm/series/the-cut-the-crap-show/ep-145-stronger-develop-the-resilience-you-need-to-succeed-with-dr-george-everly

At the end of the podcast I a refer to the "Follow your Gift" talk, by Steve Harvey.

You can find a recording of this talk on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3x3rEg2qvcQ


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HPR2832: How I got started in Linux

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This is just a brief intro into my introduction to Linux.


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HPR2831: Interview with Robbie Ferguson

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When it comes to monitoring your network, and the machines on it, you have a lot of options. But, let’s face it : none of those are easy to implement, and configuring a monitoring tool, whether it’s an open-source or a proprietary one, is often complex and time consuming.

Well, someone took that matter into their own hands, and made NEMS. What is NEMS, how can it help us, and what infrastructure does it require? Those are a few of the questions I asked Robbie Ferguson, the maintainer of NEMS, who joined me on Easter week-end for a little chat.

Links


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HPR2830: HPR NYE Show 2018-2019 part 1

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Hacker Public Radio New Years Show episode 1

Welcome to the 7th Annual Hacker Public Radio show. It is December the 31st 2018 and the time is 10 hundred hours UTC.

"we should have bought stock"


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HPR2829: Discussion around fair use clips on HPR

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Request for comments

Hi All,

Under safe harbor provisions, we as volunteers are usually insulated from any copyright issues that may arise in the shows. "We do not vet, edit, moderate or in any way censor any of the shows on the network, we trust you to do that."

This we got by accident because "This is a long standing tradition arising from the fact that HPR is a community of peers who believe that any host has as much right to submit shows as any other."

In the show notes associated with hpr2829 on 2019-06-06, the host included the following text "For all included materials: If anyone feels they have right to any material in this show please let me know and I will comply."

This violates the HPR upload policy.

"Never include content, for example music, in your show that you do not have permission to redistribute. Try to avoid using any content in your show that can not be redistributed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license. If you are redistributing under another Creative Commons License or by arranged permission please make note of the restrictions when you upload your show. We can then signal that, so that others who redistribute HPR content can filter your show out."

As it was clear that they were not in compliance, I contacted the host. The host has been very helpful and has already removed some of the content but commented "There are still 2 audio clips included. I claim I can use them on the basis off fair use principles."

While the host may be correct, if they are not, then it is me and not the host that will be held responsible for posting it. I do not want that responsibility.

Under the current HPR rules I am allowed to reject this submission.

Before I do, I would appreciate as much feedback as possible on this topic so that we can gauge the opinions of the HPR Community as a whole.

Regards,

Ken.

The discussion thread remains open and is open to all by joining the Maillist.


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HPR2828: Writing Web Game in Haskell - Science, part 2

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Intro

Last time we looked how to model technology and research. This time we’ll do some actual research. I’m skipping over some of the details as the episode is long enough as it is. Hopefully it’s still possible to follow with the show notes.

Main concepts that I’m mentioning: Technology allows usage of specific buildings, ship components and such. Research unlock technologies and may have antecedents that has to be completed before the research can be started. Research cost is measure of how expensive a research is in terms of research points, which are produced by different buildings.

Earlier I modeled tech tree as Map that had Technology as keys and Research as values. I realized that this is suboptimal and will replace it at some point in the future.

Server API

There’s three resources that client can connect to. First one is for retrieving list of available research, second one for manipulating current research and last one for retrieving info on how much research points is being produced.

/api/research/available     ApiAvailableResearchR       GET
/api/research/current       ApiCurrentResearchR         GET POST DELETE
/api/research/production    ApiResearchProductionR      GET

Simulation

Simulation of research is done by handleFactionResearch, which does simulation for one faction for a given date. After calculating current research point production and retrieving list of current research, function calculates progress of current researches. Unfinished ones are written back to database, while completed are moved into completed_research table. Final step is updating what research will be available in the next turn.

handleFactionResearch date faction = do
    production <- totalProduction $ entityKey faction
    current <- selectList [ CurrentResearchFactionId ==. entityKey faction ] []
    let updated = updateProgress production <$> current
    _ <- updateUnfinished updated
    _ <- handleCompleted date updated $ entityKey faction
    _ <- updateAvailableResearch $ entityKey faction
    return ()

Research point production

Research points are produced by buildings. So first step is to load all planets owned by the faction and buildings on those planets. Applying researchOutput function to each building yields a list of TotalResearchScore, which is then summed up by mconcat. We can use mconcat as TotalResearchScore is a monoid (I talked about these couple episodes ago).

totalProduction fId = do
    pnbs <- factionBuildings fId
    let buildings = join $ fmap snd pnbs
    return $ mconcat $ researchOutput . entityVal <$> buildings

researchOutput function below uses pattern matching. Instead of writing one function definition and case expression inside of it, we’re writing multiple definitions. Each of them matches building of different type. First example is definition that is used for ResearchComplex, while second one is for ParticleAccelerator. Final case uses underscore to match anything and indicate that we’re not even interested on the particular value being matched. mempty is again from our monoid definition. It is empty or unit value of monoid, which in case of TotalResearchScore is zero points in all research categories.

researchOutput Building { buildingType = ResearchComplex } =
    TotalResearchScore
    { totalResearchScoreEngineering = ResearchScore 10
    , totalResearchScoreNatural = ResearchScore 10
    , totalResearchScoreSocial = ResearchScore 10
    }

researchOutput Building { buildingType = ParticleAccelerator } =
    TotalResearchScore
    { totalResearchScoreEngineering = ResearchScore 15
    , totalResearchScoreNatural = ResearchScore 15
    , totalResearchScoreSocial = ResearchScore 0
    }

researchOutput _ = mempty

Updating progress

Moving research forward is more complex looking function. There’s bunch of filtering and case expressions going on, but the idea is hopefully clear after a bit of explanation.

updateProgress takes two parameters, total production of research points and current research that is being modified. This assumes that there are only one of each categories of research going on at any given time. If there were more, we would have to divide research points between them by some logic. Function calculates effect of research points on current research and produces a new current research that is the end result.

Perhaps the most interesting part is use of lenses. For example, line entityValL . currentResearchProgressL +~ engResearch $ curr means that curr (which is Entity CurrentResearch) is used as starting point. First we reach to data part of Entity and then we focus on currentResearchProgress and add engResearch to it. This results a completely new Entity CurrentResearch being constructed, which is otherwise identical with the original, but the currentResearchProgress has been modified. Without lenses we would have to do this destructuring and restructuring manually.

updateProgress :: TotalResearchScore ResearchProduction -> Entity CurrentResearch -> Entity CurrentResearch
updateProgress prod curr =
    case researchCategory <$> research of
        Just (Engineering _) ->
            entityValL . currentResearchProgressL +~ engResearch $ curr

        Just (NaturalScience _) ->
            entityValL . currentResearchProgressL +~ natResearch $ curr

        Just (SocialScience _) ->
            entityValL . currentResearchProgressL +~ socResearch $ curr

        Nothing ->
            curr
    where
        research = Map.lookup (currentResearchType . entityVal $ curr) techMap
        engResearch = unResearchScore $ totalResearchScoreEngineering prod
        natResearch = unResearchScore $ totalResearchScoreNatural prod
        socResearch = unResearchScore $ totalResearchScoreSocial prod

Writing unfinished research back to database is short function. First we find ones that hasn’t been finished by filtering with (not . researchReady . entityVal) and then we apply replace to write them back one by one.

updateUnfinished updated = do
    let unfinished = filter (not . researchReady . entityVal) updated
    mapM (\x -> replace (entityKey x) (entityVal x)) unfinished

Handling finished research starts by finding out which ones were actually completed by filtering with (researchReady . entityVal) and their research type with currentResearchType . entityVal. Rest of the function is all about database actions: creating entries into completed_research and adding news entries for each completed research, then removing entries from current_research and available_research.

handleCompleted date updated fId = do
    let finished = filter (researchReady . entityVal) updated
    let finishedTech = currentResearchType . entityVal <$> finished
    insertMany_ $ currentToCompleted date . entityVal <$> finished
    insertMany_ $ researchCompleted date fId . (currentResearchType . entityVal) <$> finished
    deleteWhere [ CurrentResearchId <-. fmap entityKey finished ]
    deleteWhere [ AvailableResearchType <-. finishedTech
                , AvailableResearchFactionId ==. fId ]

Available research

Figuring out what researches will be available for the next turn takes several steps. I won’t be covering random numbers in detail, they’re interesting enough for an episode on their own. It’s enough to know that g <- liftIO getStdGen gets us a new random number generator that is seeded by current time.

updateAvailableResearch starts by loading available research and current research for the faction and initializing a new random number generator. g can be used multiple times, but it’ll always return same sequence of numbers. Here it doesn’t matter, but in some cases it might. getR is helper function I wrote that uses random number generator to pick n entries from a given list. n in our case is hard coded to 3, but later on I’ll add possibility for player to research technologies that raise this limit. newAvailableResearch (we’ll look into its implementation closer just in a bit) produces a list of available research for specific research category. These lists are combined with <> operator and written into database with rewriteAvailableResearch.

updateAvailableResearch fId = do
    available <- selectList [ AvailableResearchFactionId ==. fId ] []
    completed <- selectList [ CompletedResearchFactionId ==. fId ] []
    g <- liftIO getStdGen
    let maxAvailable = ResearchLimit 3
    -- reusing same g should not have adverse effect here
    let engCand = getR g (unResearchLimit maxAvailable) $ newAvailableResearch isEngineering maxAvailable available completed
    let natCand = getR g (unResearchLimit maxAvailable) $ newAvailableResearch isNaturalScience maxAvailable available completed
    let socCand = getR g (unResearchLimit maxAvailable) $ newAvailableResearch isSocialScience maxAvailable available completed
    rewriteAvailableResearch fId $ engCand <> natCand <> socCand

newAvailableResearch is in charge of figuring out what, if any, new research should be available in the next turn. In case where amount of currently available research is same or greater than research limit, empty list is returned, otherwise function calculates candidates and returns them. Logic for that is following:

  • candidates are research of specific category of those that has been unlock and unresearched
  • unlocked and unresearched are unlocked ones that are in list of known technology
  • unlocked research are ones with antecedents available in tech tree
  • known technology are ones in list of completed research

and complete definition of the function is shown below:

newAvailableResearch selector limit available completed =
    if ResearchLimit (length specificCategory) >= limit
        then []
        else candidates
    where
        specificCategory = filter (availableResearchFilter selector) available
        candidates = filter (selector . researchCategory) unlockedAndUnresearched
        unlockedAndUnresearched = filter (\x -> researchType x `notElem` knownTech) unlockedResearch
        unlockedResearch = filter (antecedentsAvailable knownTech) $ unTechTree techTree
        knownTech = completedResearchType . entityVal <$> completed


availableResearchFilter f x =
    maybe False (f . researchCategory) res
    where
        res = Map.lookup (availableResearchType $ entityVal x) techMap

Final step of the simulation of research is to update database with new available research. mkUniq is helper function that removes duplicate elements from a list. It’s used in rewriteAvailableResearch function to make a list that contains all unique top research categories (engineering, natural sciences and social sciences). If the resulting list isn’t empty, we’ll use it to remove all available research for those top categories and insert new available research.

rewriteAvailableResearch fId res = do
    let cats = mkUniq $ fmap (topCategory . researchCategory) res
    unless (null cats) $ do
        deleteWhere [ AvailableResearchFactionId ==. fId
                    , AvailableResearchCategory <-. cats ]
        insertMany_ $ researchToAvailable fId <$> res

Now everything is ready for next round of simulation.


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HPR2827: Unscripted ramblings from my garage about my first CTF event

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Unscripted ramblings about an upcoming CTF event.

Hak5 items mentioned (hak5.org):

  • WiFi Pineapple
  • Bash Bunny (erroneously referred to as a ‘rabbit’)
  • USB Rubber Ducky
  • Packet Squirrel
  • LAN Turtle (unmentioned but I’ll bring one)

Software mentioned:

My info:

Links


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HPR2826: HPR Community News for May 2019

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New hosts

Welcome to our new hosts:
Joel D, Zen_Floater2.

Last Month's Shows

Id Day Date Title Host
2803 Wed 2019-05-01 Update on my Raspi 3 B OpenMedia Vault and Next Cloud instances JWP
2804 Thu 2019-05-02 Awk Part 13: Fix-Width Field Processing b-yeezi
2805 Fri 2019-05-03 My 50th Show Tony Hughes AKA TonyH1212
2806 Mon 2019-05-06 HPR Community News for April 2019 HPR Volunteers
2807 Tue 2019-05-07 Are bash local variables local? clacke
2808 Wed 2019-05-08 Haskell function types tuturto
2809 Thu 2019-05-09 The Blue Oak Model License and Its One Big Gotcha Joel D
2810 Fri 2019-05-10 Wi-Fi on Android Ken Fallon
2811 Mon 2019-05-13 Interview with Alan Pope Yannick
2812 Tue 2019-05-14 Is 5G mobile data a danger to your health? clacke
2813 Wed 2019-05-15 Should we dump the linux Desktop. knightwise
2814 Thu 2019-05-16 Spectre and Meltdown and OpenBSD and our future Zen_Floater2
2815 Fri 2019-05-17 Copy pasta klaatu
2816 Mon 2019-05-20 Gnu Awk - Part 14 Dave Morriss
2817 Tue 2019-05-21 Are you successful? Click to find out more! clacke
2818 Wed 2019-05-22 Writing Web Game in Haskell - Science, part 1 tuturto
2819 Thu 2019-05-23 Reply to Knightwise - podcasts Ahuka
2820 Fri 2019-05-24 29 - CERT Home Security Tips Ahuka
2821 Mon 2019-05-27 Interviewing some exhibitors at the 2019 vcfe.org event Jeroen Baten
2822 Tue 2019-05-28 What's in the Box! Part 1 NYbill
2823 Wed 2019-05-29 Gentoo and why I use it aldenp
2824 Thu 2019-05-30 Gnu Awk - Part 15 Dave Morriss
2825 Fri 2019-05-31 More text to speech trials Ken Fallon

Comments this month

These are comments which have been made during the past month, either to shows released during the month or to past shows. There are 16 comments in total.

Past shows

There are 6 comments on 4 previous shows:

  • hpr2504 (2018-03-08) "Intro to Git with pen and paper" by klaatu.
    • Comment 1: Ken Fallon on 2019-05-23: "This needs to be a video"

  • hpr2793 (2019-04-17) "bash coproc: the future (2009) is here" by clacke.
    • Comment 2: clacke on 2019-05-04: "Re: backquotes vs dollar-paren"
    • Comment 3: clacke on 2019-05-09: "Re: awk coprocesses"
    • Comment 4: Dave Morriss on 2019-05-09: "Regarding awk coprocesses"

  • hpr2794 (2019-04-18) "Interview with Martin Wimpress" by Yannick.
    • Comment 1: Klaatu on 2019-05-26: "Great interview"

  • hpr2798 (2019-04-24) "Should Podcasters be Pirates ?" by knightwise.
    • Comment 4: Klaatu on 2019-05-07: "This is one of those episodes..."

This month's shows

There are 10 comments on 4 of this month's shows:

  • hpr2806 (2019-05-06) "HPR Community News for April 2019" by HPR Volunteers.
    • Comment 1: clacke on 2019-05-09: "Yggdrasil and Hollywood"
    • Comment 2: clacke on 2019-05-09: "HKOSCON2019"

  • hpr2809 (2019-05-09) "The Blue Oak Model License and Its One Big Gotcha" by Joel D.
    • Comment 1: norrist on 2019-05-09: "The show _was_ fun"
    • Comment 2: Joel D on 2019-05-16: "re: norrist"

  • hpr2813 (2019-05-15) "Should we dump the linux Desktop." by knightwise.
    • Comment 1: Yannick on 2019-05-15: "Should we dump Windows? "
    • Comment 2: Hipstre on 2019-05-15: "Do We Need Linux?"
    • Comment 3: DV on 2019-05-16: "Response to knightwise"
    • Comment 4: DeepGeek on 2019-05-17: "Desktop is Dead"
    • Comment 5: Snapdeus on 2019-05-17: "Linux desktop"

  • hpr2814 (2019-05-16) "Spectre and Meltdown and OpenBSD and our future" by Zen_Floater2.
    • Comment 1: ClaudioM on 2019-05-17: "Hello, Fellow Puffy Disciple!"

Mailing List discussions

Policy decisions surrounding HPR are taken by the community as a whole. This discussion takes place on the Mail List which is open to all HPR listeners and contributors. The discussions are open and available on the HPR server under Mailman.

The threaded discussions this month can be found here:

http://hackerpublicradio.org/pipermail/hpr_hackerpublicradio.org/2019-May/thread.html

Events Calendar

With the kind permission of LWN.net we are linking to The LWN.net Community Calendar.

Quoting the site:

This is the LWN.net community event calendar, where we track events of interest to people using and developing Linux and free software. Clicking on individual events will take you to the appropriate web page.

Any other business

Links

Tags and Summaries

Over the period tags and/or summaries have been added to 10 shows which were without them.

If you would like to contribute to the tag/summary project visit the summary page at https://hackerpublicradio.org/report_missing_tags.php and follow the instructions there.


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